Children of the Arbat *** (of 4) by Anatoli Rybakov

 Book Reviews, Europe, FICTION, History  Comments Off on Children of the Arbat *** (of 4) by Anatoli Rybakov
Sep 252016
 

arbatThe Arbat is a Moscow neighborhood; its children are the teens and twenty-somethings caught up in Stalin’s increasingly repressive communism of the 1930s.  These youth are generally supportive of the socialist ideals that brought communists to power in the years when they were born, are anxious to uplift of the proletariat and at the same time enjoy the vices and virtues of cafes, restaurants, and urban nightlife.  One of their own, however, Sasha Pankratov, is exiled to Siberia on charges that are unfairly enforced by a mid-level government apparatchik. Stalin is portrayed throughout as an increasingly paranoid and unstable megalomaniac.  Sasha’s friends blindly feel their way into an increasingly uncertain future — the rule of law is vanishing, Germany is increasingly militaristic, government is less trustworthy —  and Sasha must decide how to make meaning with what is left of his life in a world with other exiles surviving among Siberian peasants.  Rybakov wrote this book while still under communist rule and released it just as perestroika was first opening the USSR.  My mother’s Russian immigrant friend was a child of the Arbat and says the book is spot on accurate.

A Tale of Two Recipes

 Sourdoughs and SCOBYs  Comments Off on A Tale of Two Recipes
Aug 302016
 

pancakes

These sourdough pancakes received Sue’s highest marks so far.  Generally speaking, Sue does not like sour pancakes, nor pancakes that are too heavy and these golden, crepe-like hotcakes were light and delicate.  I can’t tell you exactly how I made them because as is my practice I made up the recipe.  I had extra starter from another bread I was making and was in the mood for pancakes because it is peach season.pancakes and peaches

In addition to starter I added a considerable quantity of cornmeal, the remainder of our quart of buttermilk (about a cup), flaxseed meal, the spent mash from my soymilk maker (called okara), a pour of vegetable oil, more nonfat milk when the batter was still two thick, two egg yolks, and two beaten egg whites.  The advantage to recipe-free cooking is the freedom to improvise and feel creative, even accomplished when dishes exceed expectations.  The disadvantages are obvious.  How do you recall for a later date, or pass along to a friend, a recipe that calls for a considerable quantity, about a cup, and unknown amounts of meal and mash?  How, for that matter, do you know what went wrong when a combination bombs?  And what does my cooking style say about my larger defiance of conformity?

And so with significant difficulty I once again followed the formula for Tartine’s country bread created by Chad Robertson.  I measured ingredients to the gram, folded my dough on thirty minute intervals for three hours, refrigerated over night, and produced a loaf so exquisitely professional that another bread-baking friend said, “The bread you made put every other fantastic bread I’ve ever had to shame. Wow!!! Thanks for sharing!!!”Tartine's crumb

Kosher USA by Roger Horowitz *** (of 4)

 America, Book Reviews, Business, Food, Judaism/Jewish Culture, NON FICTION  Comments Off on Kosher USA by Roger Horowitz *** (of 4)
Aug 302016
 

kosherHow does a food receive kosher approval?  For some items, like the prohibition of pork, the Torah is comparatively clear.  But what about a more modern food like Jell-O which contains gelatin, a substance derived from forbidden bones and hides of animals, but has been turned into a chemical that no longer has much, if any, relationship to its origin?  Some rabbis would give Jell-O a kosher stamp.  Now, what if the hide used to make the chemical called gelatin was a pig’s?  Kosher USA if nothing else is provocative and at its best points to centuries of rabbinic debate still alive as food becomes more and more processed.  Horowitz’s academic style and heavy emphasis on the political interplay of corporations and rabbis are sparsely balanced by personal anecdotes, which in many instances, are more captivating than the long passages of textbook-like replays of angry letters between generally conservative rabbis supporting modernization and orthodox rabbis insistent upon glatt kosher laws that adhere to Torah but are indifferent to animal suffering or worker rights.

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi *** (of 5)

 Africa, African American Literature, America, Book Reviews, FICTION  Comments Off on Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi *** (of 5)
Aug 182016
 

homegoingGyasi uses her own experience as a Ghanaian American to create an original tale of history.  We are asked to follow the descendants of one family member captured in northern Ghana, sold to the British, imprisoned in the Cape Coast Castle and shipped to the United States as enslaved chattel.  The other continues residence in Ghana under the curse of the ancestors.  While the raw brutality of enslavement is on full display, the remaining lives in Ghana are not to be envied.  Over the centuries, Ghanaians capture neighbors and sell them, they fight off British overlords, barely, and are trapped by superstition and custom.  Alas, Gyasi, a very young writer, has bitten off more than she can regurgitate in such a short novel.  Trying to cover two continents and all the generations encumbered by nearly three centuries means the recounting of too many stories that feel just a bit familiar: an aborted ride on the underground railroad, a slave whose back is scarred beyond recognition by whippings, the Middle Passage is inhumanely sickening.  The stories from Ghana are of course newer for us, but their brevity makes many of them too shallow to appreciate.

The Long Way Home by Louise Penny *** (of 4)

 Audio Book, Book Reviews, FICTION, Mystery  Comments Off on The Long Way Home by Louise Penny *** (of 4)
Aug 182016
 

longwayhomeMaybe the tenth in the series of mysteries for Chief Detective of the Quebec Surete, Armand Gamache.  Having recently retired to Three Pines, now former chief Gamache is asked to locate artist, Peter Morrow, wife of Clara, who has been missing for a year. Author Louise Penny is returning to her roots, too, as the first in this series was also about the power of art and psychology of artists.  Penny is also experimenting.  There is no murder to open the story.  In fact, the whole novel revolves around a missing person, which is to say, nothing really happens, and while the first half feels patient and funny, the second half is plodding and so devoid of action that it gets a little boring.  Still, the main characters are warm and inviting and after a bit, I’m sure I’ll go on to subsequent mysteries.

The Lazarus Project by Aleksander Hemon *** (of 5)

 Book Reviews, Europe, FICTION, History, Immigration, Jewish History  Comments Off on The Lazarus Project by Aleksander Hemon *** (of 5)
Aug 012016
 

lazarusIn 1908 a Jewish immigrant named Lazarus Averbuch knocked on the door of Chicago’s police chief.  After handing the Chief Shippy a letter (we never learn what it says), a frightened police force shoots Lazarus several times until he is quite dead.  Aleksander Hemon writes one fictional account of Lazarus’s murder, a second of the author’s parallel immigration from Bosnia to the United States, a third about his investigation into Lazarus’s origins in Eastern Europe and life in Chicago’s tenements, and a fourth as a travelogue back to Bosnia taken by the author and a fantastical story-telling companion named Rora.  Lazarus dies because deeply anti-Semitic law and order fears anarchists are destroying America and anyone with dark skin, big ears or a nose that might be Jewish is suspect.  Immigration to a new country is awful, except it is not as bad as the pogroms that drive you to flee.  Getting an author’s grant to take adventures through post-war Sarajevo and rural slavic countries provides good product for a novel, but ambitious, and award-winning as the novel is, the multiple story lines all remain too independent to cohere into a compelling whole.

Jul 222016
 

one_of_us_0Even if you do not recall the Oslo terrorist attack in 2011, the opening pages of this book make certain there is no surprise.  Anders Breivik, a native of Norway exploded a homemade bomb in front of the Prime Minister’s residence and then drove a van to Utoya Island to murder socialist youth.  He killed seventy-seven people, most of them children, nearly all with gunshots to the back of the head.  Only a few pages after it opens, the story returns to the beginning of Anders Breivik’s life to uncover in page-turning detail his development as a right-wing terrorist bent upon preserving Norway’s ethnic purity from creeping left-wing government policy.  Breivik emerges as a psychotic, deranged killer.  Except his continued lucidity and consistent logic of self-defined clarity of purpose make him indistinguishable from any member of ISIS, the Taliban, fanatical Israeli settlers and their Hamas counterparts, the routine gun-wielding mass shooters that too routinely make our headlines, more than a few affiliate of the NRA, and several of my neighbors in northwest Pennsylvania.  One of us.  This book explains what runs through their minds and then asks us to define the border between idealistic soldier of freedom and the psychologically impaired.

What we Talk about when we Talk about Anne Frank *** (of 4) by Nathan Englander

 Book Reviews, FICTION, Israel, Judaism/Jewish Culture, Short stories  Comments Off on What we Talk about when we Talk about Anne Frank *** (of 4) by Nathan Englander
Jul 132016
 

anne frankEight short stories.  All of them sad.  Englander pitches his stories to test the limits of love in binding marriages, ageless friendships, families, and neighbors.  Two matriarchs of Israel’s settler movement are asked if they can continue to stand by one another as personal tragedies and then national tragedies overtake them.  Childhood friends from yeshiva are reunited after one has become an ultra-orthodox Israeli and the other the mother of a secular son in Florida.  Now both married they sit with their husbands and prod one another: for whom would they would sacrifice themselves to save another’s life?  Holocaust survivors pass a lifetime in an Israeli shuk acting upon, but not speaking of the unspeakable.  Englander’s stories make us think about our own boundaries and sometimes about what in the world he is up to when, for example, he places a protagonist in a peep show staring first at his Rabbi and then at his mother.  The author’s directive is that relationships are untrustworthy.

Bread Diversity

 Sourdoughs and SCOBYs  Comments Off on Bread Diversity
Jul 132016
 

Sourdough Raisin-Walnut Bread

Raisin Walnut Bread

Here’s a slice of raisin – walnut bread.  I used golden and Thompson raisins that had plumped overnight in water and nearly two full teaspoons of cinnamon.  The walnuts were just the right counterpoint and the loaf was pillowy soft.  An egg and some buttermilk in the dough provided a creaminess in the final product that was new for me.  I was expecting more sweetness and less sour, but the raisins did their trick.  What a combination of flavors: sourdough, spicy cinnamon, fruity raisins, and nuttiness.

Now check out another sourdough just to see how different breads can be.

Scallion Flat Breads

Scallion Flat Breads

Inspired by a blog post Sue sent me I made a sourdough variation of David Lebovitz’s scallion flat breads.  Using long, fresh scallions recently harvested from the college garden and a whole lot of whole wheat I let this dough rise for a good long time until it was quite sour.  I chopped the scallions, kneaded them in, and let the breads rise again.  I pressed each small ball of dough flat and fried them until they were just beginning to toast.  Salt, sour, earthy wheatiness, scallions, oil.

By themselves they were a complete food, but wrapped around cheddar cheese, thickly sliced tomato, and a couple of leaves of lettuce and they had to be eaten with closed eyes.

 

Tree of Smoke by Denis Johnson **** (of 4)

 Asia, Book Reviews, FICTION, FOUR STARS ****, Prize Winner, Sixties  Comments Off on Tree of Smoke by Denis Johnson **** (of 4)
Jun 232016
 

treeofsmokeIn so many ways Tree of Smoke is easier to describe for what it really is not.  The setting is Vietnam, and to a lesser extent the Philippines, in the 1960s, but it is not a war novel.  The protagonist, Skip Sands, works for the CIA, but neither is Tree of Smoke a spy story.  Rather Johnson’s award winning novel is a detailed chronicle of a number of lives over the course of the 1960s told with page-turning drive and riveting attention to detail.  Every baguette served in Saigon tastes a little different from the last.  The temperature of the tea is hot on your tongue.  The swampy humidity makes your clothes stick to you and each character’s choices in life seem preordained.  A pair of down-and-out brothers from Arizona go off to fight in Vietnam and after being discharged continue to fight enemies within and without.  A Canadian missionary heals orphans when no one else will because her bible leaves her no alternative.  The Colonel is larger than life and for a time bigger than the army until he isn’t. . Uncertainty, like much of life, pervades.  America’s role in Southeast Asia is a perfect metaphor.