Resource Identification

Internal Funding Sources

Public Funding Sources

Private Funding Sources

Additional Resources

Books and Periodicals

Internal Funding Sources

The Academic Support Committee has funds for faculty development in areas related to research and teaching. These funds are available to all full-time faculty and typically are used to support a specific project, either while on sabbatical leave or during summer/semester breaks, or for small supply/equipment funds (on a one-time basis).

In addition, the Dean of the College’s Office administers several funds for faculty research and travel, and the Academic Support Committee has funds available for travel. More information about these internal funds, including guidelines for application, is available in the Faculty Handbook, or you can contact Linda DeMeritt, dean of the College, or Ben Slote, associate dean of the College.

Aside from these internal sources of support, generally there are two sources for grant money: public and private. Public sources, such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), are funded by the federal or state government. Private sources of funding include foundations and corporations.

Public Funding Sources

The federal and state governments support a number of agencies that award grants for different purposes. Public agencies attract large numbers of proposals and usually have very stringent guidelines about proposal formats and required institutional information. These vary widely from agency to agency. Information about the grants available, application guidelines and deadlines can be found at each agency’s Web site (see links below) or through the Office of Foundation & Corporate Relations.

The Independent Colleges Office: Allegheny is a member of the Independent Colleges Office (ICO), which helps member institutions seek grants from federal agencies. The ICO helps Allegheny establish and maintain Washington contacts who provide guidance as we develop proposals and administer grants.

A note about deadlines: If you are submitting a proposal to a public agency, please allow extra time before the deadline for our help with such steps as checking your proposal against the guidelines, proofreading, typing the forms, making the necessary copies and gathering signatures. (Most agencies will not consider a proposal that does not conform exactly to their requirements.) In addition, federal agencies require you to follow special electronic submission procedures. Because so many institutions submit proposals to federal agencies, however, electronic submission programs may be overwhelmed at deadline times, so you need to submit your proposal well ahead of the deadline.

The following Web sites can provide you with information about funding priorities, application guidelines and deadlines:

Private Funding Sources

Private foundations and corporations represent another source of funding. Although private sources tend to be more relaxed about the proposal process, unsolicited proposals to private sources are rarely funded. Generally, a successful proposal requires an ongoing relationship between the College and the foundation or corporation.

If you have identified a foundation or corporation as a potential source of funding, please call the Office of Foundation & Corporate Relations. We will research the organization, its history, and its relationship (if any) with Allegheny for you, and – together – we will develop a strategy for approaching the organization.

There are hundreds of private foundations. We have included selected links to some of these organizations below.

Links to Selected Private Foundations:

Additional Resources

In addition to the links above, the following sites may be helpful as you research funding sources:

Books and Periodicals

The Office of Foundation & Corporate Relations has a number of reference books and periodicals that provide information about the grant seeking process. These include:

  • Charting a Meaningful Scholarly Career: ICO Faculty Development Handbook
  • The Foundation Center’s Guide to Proposal Writing
  • The “How to” Grants Manual by David G. Bauer
  • Successful Program Evaluation by Michael K. Wells, CFRE