Senior Hernstrom-Hill Wins Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize

Allegheny College senior Madeline Hernstrom-Hill has won the Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize for her short story “The Church of the Reformed Eden.”

The prize, awarded to an outstanding undergraduate author, includes a $1,000 prize, a full scholarship to the Southampton Writers Conference in July 2018 and consideration for publication in The Southampton Review.

Judge Amy Hempel, author of six acclaimed books of short fiction, selected Hernstrom-Hill’s story from more than 200 entries.

“This story features a remarkably complex, compelling, and humane look at some of the most important issues of the day: immigration, religious extremism, our destruction of the planet, same-sex partners, for example,” Hempel wrote in praise. “But there is never an agenda, rather they appear as part of a decent woman’s experience, a woman who is making her way in Florida to support her family in the Dominican Republic. In strong, assured prose, the author shows us what it is to try to navigate this difficult terrain while protecting one’s sense of oneself and staying open to possibilities that appear in truly surprising forms.”

Hernstrom-Hill, a double major in history and English with an emphasis in creative writing, wrote and revised “The Church of the Reformed Eden” as part of a combined senior comprehensive project and independent study group mentored by Matthew Ferrence, associate professor of creative writing. She described the work as speculative fiction.

“A woman immigrates to St. Augustine, Florida, from the Dominican Republic and accidentally falls in love with a female priest whose religion is on the wacky side,” said Hernstrom-Hill, 21, of Boston. “Everything spirals from there.”

The prize and Hemphill’s praise are validating, she said.

“My great fear, and the fear of a lot of undergraduate writers, is we write as undergraduates and we don’t actually go on and get into this community of people who write (beyond college) and are able to make a career out of writing,” Hernstrom-Hill said. “It’s super validating to have someone in that circle say nice things about my writing. It makes me feel happy about my possibilities after graduation.”

The 12-day conference, her first, is a chance to improve her writing and “see writers who are outside of college and be able to speak to people in the field and get a feel for how you actually do this,” she said.

Hernstrom-Hill credited Allegheny’s creative writing program for giving her the confidence to submit the story for consideration.

“I wouldn’t have produced this without being part of this supportive, very passionate creative writing community,” she said.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Hernstrom-Hill Awarded Short Fiction Prize

Madeline Hernstrom-Hill ’18 was awarded the Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize for her short story “The Church of the Reformed Eden.” The prize includes a scholarship to the Southampton Writers Conference in July.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Tour of Historic Holland Hall, former Huidekoper Mansion

 

On Friday, September 22, the History Department coordinated with the Crawford County Historical Association to lead a group of more than 70 community members, including many History faculty and students, through a local historical site. Holland Hall, the former Huidekoper Mansion (located near campus at 681 Terrace Street) was built in 1899 for Arthur Clarke and Frances Reynolds Huidekoper, daughter of the Baldwin-Reynolds House Museum’s William and Julia Reynolds.  Dutch Revival in inspiration, the home served the family until the 1930s when, after the owners passed away, their children moved to Conneaut Lake and deeded it to Allegheny College. It served as the Phi Delta Theta House for many years, and now, after a period of private ownership, work is underway to return it to its former beauty. The Department was delighted to have the opportunity to connect the College community with our local history.

Wu’s Research Featured in Journals

Associate Professor of History Guo Wu published a research article titled “Zheng Zhen and the Rise of Evidential Research in Late Qing Northern Guizhou” online in Journal of Chinese History (Cambridge University Press) in August, and another paper titled “Outsourcing the State Power: Extrajudicial Incarceration During the Cultural Revolution” appears in China: An International Journal (National University of Singapore Press). vol.15, no.3, (August 2017). In early May, he presented a paper “American Studies on Chinese Ethnic Minorities and Borderlands” to the Chinese Conference on Sinology and Translation, Nankai University, China, and in June, he presented a paper titled “‘A White Horse is Not a Horse’? Rethinking Pre-Qin Chinese Sophism in Light of Aristotelian Epistemology”, to the annual conference of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy at Peking University, China.In May 2017, he was invited by the College of Ethnology and Sociology, Central-Southern University of Nationalities (Wuhan) to deliver a talk titled “American Studies of Modern Chinese History: Present and Future.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Weidenhof Published in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Alex J. Weidenhof (History, ’19) recently published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. See the article here.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Pinnow co-authors blog post on Russia policy

Professor of History Ken Pinnow co-authored a blog post about the Obama administration’s Russia policy for the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. Read the post here: http://jordanrussiacenter.org/news/obama-us-miscalculation-russia/#.WItFsRiZPow

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Students to Attend National Conference at Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics

Allegheny College students will participate in the National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement conference at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), February 3-5.

The 2017 National Campaign conference will focus on identifying the root causes of national divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election and work to formulate strategies to bridge gaps between all Americans. Student ambassadors and staff members from 28 colleges and universities across the country will convene on the Harvard campus with the mission to create a nationally coordinated program to Reconnect America.

Allegheny students Jesse Tomkiewicz and Hannah Firestone will attend the conference along with Dr. Patrick Jackson, visiting assistant professor of History and Philosophy and Religious Studies.

“The conference presents a unique opportunity for tomorrow’s leaders to have a vitally important discussion about divisiveness in our country and how we as a nation can best move forward with civility and respect for all,” said Allegheny College President James H. Mullen, Jr.

Brian Harward, director of Allegheny’s Center for Political Participation, said students come away from the conference inspired.

“Allegheny has sent students from its Center for Political Participation for several years. Each time, students return to our campus and community energized to engage the important and complex issues that confront us,” Harward said.

Since 2003, the National Campaign has held annual conferences to identify collaborative projects, foster engagement in electoral politics, assist students in pursuing careers in public service, and provide a foundation in civic education. Led by a team of Harvard undergraduate students, the collegiate ambassadors to the National Campaign work together to achieve concrete goals, such as working with local election offices to improve the voting experience for their campus communities.

Other participating colleges and universities include Arizona State University, Elon University, Franklin & Marshall College, Georgetown University, Harvard University, Louisiana State University, The Ohio State University, Rutgers University, Saint Anselm College, Simpson College, Tennessee State University, University of Florida, University of Louisville, University of Rochester, University of Southern California, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, University of Utah, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, University of Oklahoma, Howard University, United States Military Academy, Tufts University, University of Chicago, Colby College, and University of Texas at Austin.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Angela Keysor (Weiss Faculty Lecture)

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Angela Keysor to Deliver Weiss Faculty Lecture

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Pinnow to be published, awarded fellowship

Professor of History Ken Pinnow’s article “From All Sides: Interdisciplinary Knowledge, Scientific Collaboration, and the Soviet Criminological Laboratories of the 1920s” has been accepted for publication in Slavic Review. Pinnow also was awarded a Short-term Jordan Center Fellowship at New York University. He will spend a month next summer in New York City researching the history of medical ethics and experimentation in the Soviet Union.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research