Posts Tagged ‘English’

Valerie Sweeney Prince (Weiss Faculty Lecture)

Allegheny College Associate Professor of English and Black Studies Valerie Sweeney Prince will speak on “Key Metaphors in ‘Daughter’s Exchange’” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the Campus Center Room 301/302. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Prince will draw from her soon-to- be-published book “Daughter’s Exchange: The African American Woman’s Encounter with the Intellectual Marketplace,” emphasizing the life experiences communicated through the words of Africans and women.

The address is the last one in the 2016-17 Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series, which features professors from various departments representing the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.

Canceled: James Davis May & Chelsea Rathburn (Single Voice Reading Series)

NOTE: This event has been canceled.

Authors James Davis May and Chelsea Rathburn will read from their work as part of Allegheny College’s Single Voice Reading Series on April 6 at 7 p.m. in the Tillotson Room of the Tippie Alumni Center. The event is free and open to the public.

May’s first book, “Unquiet Things,” was published in 2016. Other poems have appeared or are forthcoming in “Five Points,” “The Missouri Review,” “New England Review,” “New Ohio Review,” “New Republic,” “Pleiades,” and “The Southern Review.” In 2013, he won the Collins Award from “Birmingham Poetry Review,” and has received scholarships from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, Inprint, and the Krakow Poetry Seminar.  An Allegheny alumnus, May is currently a professor of English and creative writing at Young Harris College.

Chelsea Rathburn was raised in Florida before earning her master’s of fine arts at the University of Arkansas. Her first full-length collection, “The Shifting Line,” won the 2005 Richard Wilbur Award, and in 2009 she received a poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her work has appeared in “Poetry,” “Atlantic Monthly, “New Republic, “The Southern Review, “New England Review, “The Threepenny Review” and “Ploughshares.” She is the director of the Creative Writing Program at Young Harris College.

Bakken Awarded Residency at Virginia Center for the Creative Arts

Professor of English Christopher Bakken recently was awarded a week-long residency at Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. He has an essay forthcoming in “The Iowa Review” and his new poems have appeared in The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-A-Day series, “Michigan Quarterly Review,” and “Parnassus: Poetry in Review.”

Miller Presents Paper Examining Changing Attitudes About Decomposition

Assistant Professor of English John MacNeill Miller presented his paper “Composing Decomposition: In Memoriam and the Ecocritical Undertaking” at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) conference in Philadelphia on March 18. The essay uses a close reading of Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s elegy In Memoriam to examine how attitudes towards bodily decay have changed over time, arguing that those attitudes affect our ability to understand humanity’s impact on the natural environment.

Michaels’ ‘Sweet and Lowdown: Wood Allen’s Cinema of Regret’ Published

Lloyd Michaels, emeritus professor of English, has published “Sweet and Lowdown: Woody Allen’s Cinema of Regret” with Wallflower Press, the film imprint of Columbia University Press. The book, which covers the entirety of Allen’s prolific career, is described on the publisher’s website here and can be purchased at amazon.com or at the Allegheny College Bookstore.

Single Voice Reading Series Welcomes Authors James Davis May, Chelsea Rathburn

James Davis May and Chelsea Rathburn will read from their work as part of Allegheny College’s Single Voice Reading Series at 7 p.m. April 6, 2017 in the Tillotson Room of the Tippie Alumni Center. The event is free and open to the public. (more…)

Poet Jane Hirshfield (Single Voice Reading Series)

Poet and prose writer Jane Hirshfield will visit the campus of Allegheny College for two events on Thursday, March 9.  She will speak and answer questions on the subject of “Poetry and Mindfulness” at 12:30 p.m. in Odd Fellows 105C, and at 7 p.m. she will read from her work as part of Allegheny College’s Single Voice Reading Series in Ford Memorial Chapel. Both events are free and open to the public.
The Single Voice Reading Series will continue with appearances by Allegheny alumnus James Davis May and author Chelsea Rathburn on April 6. For more information about the Single Voice Reading Series, contact Frederick F. Seely Professor of English Christopher Bakken at cbakken@allegheny.edu.

Hart article receives 2016 Richard Braddock Award

Associate Professor of English and Director of Writing Alexis Hart‘s co-authored article “Veterans in the Writing Classroom: Three Programmatic Approaches to Facilitate the Transition from the Military to Higher Education” received the 2016 Richard Braddock Award (http://www.ncte.org/cccc/awards/braddock), which is presented to the author(s) of the outstanding article on writing or the teaching of writing in the College Composition and Communication Conference journal, College Composition and Communication (CCC) during the year ending December 31 before the annual CCCC Convention.

Allegheny Single Voice Reading Series Features Poet Jane Hirshfield

Poet and prose writer Jane Hirshfield will visit the campus of Allegheny College for two events on Thursday, March 9.  She will speak and answer questions on the subject of “Poetry and Mindfulness” at 12:30 p.m. in Odd Fellows 105C, and at 7 p.m. she will read from her work as part of Allegheny College’s Single Voice Reading Series in Ford Memorial Chapel. Both events are free and open to the public.

(more…)

David C. Miller (Weiss Faculty Lecture)

David C. Miller, professor of English at Allegheny College, will deliver the next Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture, “Chicago Consciousness: Democratic Reform and Sensorimotor Awareness,” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15 in the Henderson Campus Center, Room 301/302.

Miller’s talk will focus on consciousness and sensorimotor awareness in urban reform, contrasting the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893, better known as the “White City,” with Hull-House, founded in an immigrant ghetto. While the Fair presented an ideal city alongside the all-to-real city of Chicago, offering a spectacle of global forces such as consumerism and imperialism, Hull-House fostered mutual exchange across ethnic, class and cultural lines. The two approaches were grounded in opposing notions of human perception and interaction still with us today. Miller will examine the ideas of architect Louis Sullivan, reformer Jane Addams, philosopher John Dewey and sociologist George Herbert Mead.

The Karl Weiss Faculty Lecture Series hosts seven to eight lectures per year by faculty members from various departments in an effort to represent the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.