Posts Tagged ‘Green Gator’

DeHart Market and Dinner Features Nature’s Bounty

More than 250 diners who were lucky enough to get tickets to the 15th Annual DeHart Dinner and Market at Allegheny College on Wednesday, October 4, feasted on dishes like sweet potato and carrot puree, kofta with yogurt sauce, and maple ice cream, all grown naturally and healthfully.

Tickets for the dinner were sold out in a record 90 minutes this year, according to organizers. The culinary event honors Jennifer DeHart, an Environmental Science professor who died in 2010 after a five-year battle with cancer.

The dinner was preceded by a market on campus. The band Salmon Frank provided an enthusiastic soundtrack while vendors set up at tables, selling their produce straight to shoppers. Other activities included a game of cornhole, a stationary bike that generates electricity, and table where Nancy Schultz sells flowers.

To get the dinner started in Schultz Banquet Hall, diners were greeted by three coffee dispensers that read “Decaf,” “Outdoorsy Sumatra,” and “Royal Ethiopian.” Happy Mug Coffee, based in Edinboro, roasts 1,000 pounds of coffee a week and sells it just hours after it’s roasted.

Emmett Barr ’17, an Allegheny alumnus, was one of the employees representing the business at the market. “We roast the coffee the same day it’s bought. We get orders in the morning, and roast to fill those orders so people are getting the freshest possible coffee,” he says. (more…)

Waggett and Washko Recognized as “Campus Sustainability Champions”

Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Global Health Studies Caryl Waggett and Susan Washko ’16 were recently recognized as “Campus Sustainability Champions” by the Pennsylvania Environmental Resource Consortium. Professor Waggett was praised as the long-time director of Healthy Homes, Healthy Children and for her related efforts linking environmental and human health. Susan was recognized for her endeavors as president of Edible Allegheny, through which she assisted with the DeHart Local Foods Dinner, helped to maintain the student garden and edible plantings, led student trips to local farms, and assisted local farmers.

Boulton Presents at AASHE on “Models for Campus-Led Energy Partnerships”

Sustainability Coordinator Kelly Boulton presented “Engaging in Efficiency: Models for Campus-Led Energy Partnerships” at the October 2014 AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) conference in Portland, Oregon. Boulton focused on how Allegheny has successfully engaged the campus community — students and faculty, facilities and administration — around the business case for energy-efficient facilities. This has created a virtuous cycle of successful green building upgrades on campus and encouraged a culture of sustainability.

Gaylor Presents at Second Nature Climate Leadership Summit

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Sue Gaylor presented at the Second Nature 2014 Climate Leadership Summit in Boston on October 2. The session, “Organizing Sustainability Initiatives and the Climate Action Plan,” focused on what Allegheny as a charter signatory of the Presidents’ Climate Commitment has achieved thus far and what steps are required to reach carbon neutrality by 2020. Other Alleghenians attending the conference were President Emeritus Richard Cook, Trustee Chris Nelson, and Sustainability Coordinator Kelly Boulton.

TJ Eatmon Addresses Sustainability in Colombia

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A group of PASI participants discuss their research proposals.

Assistant Professor of Environmental Science TJ Eatmon attended the Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) at Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia from July 14-27. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, the institute brought together engineers and scientists from North, South, and Central America to address challenges and opportunities for integrating sustainability into manufacturing design and innovation. Participants worked to create new ideas for research and education projects that would allow for future cross-country collaboration.  The ideas were presented to a panel of experts, who offered suggestions and critical feedback.

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PASI participants tour COTECMAR

The PASI also included industry site visits around the region, including COTECMAR, a science and technology corporation in Cartegena that designs, constructs, maintains, and repairs naval vessels. Participants also visited SuperBrix, a manufacturing company located in Barranquilla that creates processing technology for the cereal industry.

Finally, the PASI included trips to various cultural sites that exposed participants to the language, food, music, historical landmarks, geography, and history of the Caribbean coast of Colombia.  Cultural field trips included a bus tour of the city of Cartagena, a guided tour of the Museum of the Caribbean in Barranquilla, a walk along the Rio Magadalena, and a visit to El Totumo, a mud volcano located in Santa Catalina.

Fostering Student Action Against Environmental Injustice

Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Kate J. Darby was selected to attend a recent workshop, Teaching Environmental Justice: Interdisciplinary Approaches, at Carleton College in April. She delivered an invited talk, “(Tempered)Hope in the Dark,” about how to provide students with tools for taking action to address social and environmental injustice. The workshop was an interdisciplinary approach, bringing together ideas from the humanities, social sciences, and geosciences.

Making a Stand for Green Energy

logo_tribliveAllegheny College is one of eight Pennsylvania colleges and universities recognized as top alternative energy buyers in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2013 Green Power Challenge. According to the EPA, their purchases offset carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to those from 70,233 cars during a year.

Colleges big buyers of renewable energy credits
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Debra Eardley
Published: Friday, April 26, 2013

New Phytologist Publishes Faculty Work

Professor of Environmental Science Richard Bowden was co-author on a paper, “Root stress and nitrogen deposition: consequences and research priorities,” published in New Phytologist. The work, based on long-term experiments examining acid rain impacts on forest ecosystems, examines mechanisms that govern responses by tree roots to acidic inputs, thus controlling forest nutrient cycling and productivity.

Barnhart Weighs Our Environmental Impact

Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Shaunna Barnhart presented her work titled “Challenging Land Application of Biosolids/Sewage Sludge” as part of the Appalachian Contours panel at the 2013 Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, held March 1-2. She also published an article, “Individual Energy Choices,” in the recently released Climate Change: An Encyclopedia of Science and History.

Professors and Students Present Research at Kentucky Conference

Assistant Professor of Global Health and Development Liz Olson presented her paper “Critical learning for whom? Reconsidering the importance of place in an era of globalization” as a discussion piece at the culmination of a two-part panel on Critical Learning in Critical Spaces at the Dimensions of Political Ecology conference in Lexington, Kentucky. The two-part panel that Professor Olson led and co-organized with Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Shaunna Barnhart showcased the work of three Allegheny students: Shannon Wade ’13 presented portions of her senior project titled “To Frack or Not to Frack: Performance as a Tool for Environmental Activism at Allegheny College.” Max Lindquist ’14 presented critical reflections on some of his study-away experiences in his paper titled “Place-based Pedagogy: A Student’s Perspective.” Brian Anderson ’13 also presented portions of his senior project in his paper titled “Allegheny College Students in the Context of Community Development.” These three students were part of the two-part panel that included graduate students and practicing anthropologists and geographers from around the world.