Posts Tagged ‘History’

Pinnow co-authors blog post on Russia policy

Professor of History Ken Pinnow co-authored a blog post about the Obama administration’s Russia policy for the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. Read the post here: http://jordanrussiacenter.org/news/obama-us-miscalculation-russia/#.WItFsRiZPow

Allegheny College Students to Attend National Conference at Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics

Allegheny College students will participate in the National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement conference at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), February 3-5.

The 2017 National Campaign conference will focus on identifying the root causes of national divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election and work to formulate strategies to bridge gaps between all Americans. Student ambassadors and staff members from 28 colleges and universities across the country will convene on the Harvard campus with the mission to create a nationally coordinated program to Reconnect America.

Allegheny students Jesse Tomkiewicz and Hannah Firestone will attend the conference along with Dr. Patrick Jackson, visiting assistant professor of History and Philosophy and Religious Studies.

“The conference presents a unique opportunity for tomorrow’s leaders to have a vitally important discussion about divisiveness in our country and how we as a nation can best move forward with civility and respect for all,” said Allegheny College President James H. Mullen, Jr. (more…)

Angela Keysor (Weiss Faculty Lecture)

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Professor Angela Keysor to Deliver Weiss Faculty Lecture

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Pinnow to be published, awarded fellowship

Professor of History Ken Pinnow’s article “From All Sides: Interdisciplinary Knowledge, Scientific Collaboration, and the Soviet Criminological Laboratories of the 1920s” has been accepted for publication in Slavic Review. Pinnow also was awarded a Short-term Jordan Center Fellowship at New York University. He will spend a month next summer in New York City researching the history of medical ethics and experimentation in the Soviet Union.

Herrman invited for residency in Geneva

Judson Herrman, associate professor of classical studies and Frank T. McClure Chair of Greek and Latin, has been invited for a residency in November 2016 at the Fondation Hardt pour l’étude de l’Antiquité classique, a research institute for classics in Geneva. Herrman will work on his book manuscript, Selected Political Speeches of Demosthenes.

Wu publishes article in Chinese Historical Review

Guo Wu, associate professor of history, published a research article “New Qing History: Dispute, Dialog, and Influence” in the Chinese Historical Review, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 2016), pp.47-69.

He presented a paper titled “Outsourcing State Power: Extra-Judicial Incarceration during the Chinese Cultural Revolution” to Tte Twentieth Asian Studies Conference Japan (ASCJ), July 2-3, 2016, at International Christian University in Tokyo. Professor Wu presented another paper titled, “Inside the Cowshed: Readings and Rituals during the Cultural Revolution” to “Bombard the Headquarters: A Symposium and Exhibition to Mark the 50th Anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution,” August 4-6, 2016 at the University of Melbourne, Australia.

Miller selected to participate in summer seminar

Visiting Assistant Professor of History Brian Miller has been selected to participate in the 2016 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, “Transcending Boundaries: The Ottoman Empire, Europe, the Mediterranean World, 1500-1800” at Georgetown University. (http://grants.smcm.edu/neh-summer-seminar-2016/)

Shapiro Presents Paper on “Apartheid Israel: Effective Propaganda or Counter-Productive Discourse?”

Professor of History Barry Shapiro presented a paper on “Apartheid Israel: Effective Propaganda or Counter-Productive Discourse?” at the annual Middle East Dialogue Conference of the Policy Studies Organization in Washington, D.C. on February 26.

Allegheny College Senior Honored With Award From the Central PA Chapter of the American Society for Public Administration

April 19, 2016 – Allegheny College senior Abby Lombard has received the Outstanding Student Award from the Central Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Society for Public Administration.

The yearly award is given to one undergraduate student who displays excellence and promise in public administration.

Although she is a native of Syracuse, New York, Lombard was eligible for the award because she spent 13 weeks completing a Pennsylvania House Legislative Fellowship in Harrisburg. This highly competitive fellowship program places students in leadership offices, such as offices of committee chairmen, in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Lombard was placed with two standing committees: the House Majority Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee and the House Majority Transportation Committee.

Lombard, a history and political science double major and philosophy minor, was nominated for the award during her time in Harrisburg. She will accept it May 2 during a celebration for national Public Service Recognition Week at the Dixon University Center in Harrisburg. (more…)