Posts Tagged ‘Political Science’

PBS’s Heffner on ‘Civil Discourse in an Uncivil Age’

The “incivility of bigotry” has resulted in a society unable to come together across difference, Alexander Heffner said during a keynote lecture at Allegheny College on Thursday.

“The incivility of bigotry does not mean the incivility of purely racism or xenophobia or nativism. The incivility of bigotry is the incapacity of our society to rationalize and reason with disparate political objectives and constituencies,” Heffner, host of “The Open Mind” on PBS, said to 100 students, faculty, staff and community members gathered in the Tillotson Room of the Tippie Alumni Center.

“When you have a bigoted attitude or mindset it precludes you from having an exchange that is thoughtful and deliberative and fruitful in what it yields.” (more…)

Mattiace Presents Paper on Indigenous Resistance

Professor of Political Science and International Studies Shannan Mattiace presented her paper (with co-authors Guillermo Trejo [Notre Dame] and Sandra Ley [CIDE, Mexico City]) “Indigenous Resistance to Criminal Governance in Mexico” via Skype at the Latin American Studies Association Meetings in Lima, Peru, April 28-May 1. She presented a version of this paper at the Faculty Lecture series on campus in March.

PBS’s Heffner Talks Civil Discourse

Alexander Heffner, host of PBS’s “The Open Mind,” will deliver a keynote lecture at Allegheny College on Thursday, Sept. 7, at 12:15 p.m. The lecture, “Civil Discourse in an Uncivil Age: The Quest for a Post-Partisan Citizenship,” will be held in the Tillotson Room of the Tippie Alumni Center at 12:15 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Heffner’s visit will also include a classroom visit and a breakfast workshop with students on the engagement of young people in the political process.
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Students Tackle Issue of Lack of Women in Political Arena

Kelsey Evans left a weeklong seminar having learned a lot about Pennsylvania politics — and the lack of women in leadership roles in the political arena.

“The main takeaway from the week was that it is possible for anyone to run and work in government,” said Evans, an Allegheny College sophomore from New Kensington, Pennsylvania.  

Evans was one of three Allegheny students who recently attended The National Education for Women’s New Leadership Pennsylvania, a week-long “leadership and public policy institute designed to educate and empower young women for future political participation and leadership.” Throughout the week, participants discuss the role of women in politics and policymaking in Pennsylvania with the goal of addressing the underrepresentation of women in politics. (more…)

Students Lobby Legislators to Support Private Colleges

Jesse Tomkiewicz and Carlos Sanchez had a simple but powerful message for Harrisburg: Invest in education.

The first-year Allegheny College students were among the more than 225 students from more than 30 private nonprofit colleges and universities who traveled to the state capital on April 4 as part of Student Aid Advocacy Day, sponsored by the Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Pennsylvania. The annual event gives students from AICUP-member institutions a chance to meet legislators and encourage them to support private colleges and universities. Allegheny has been sending student representatives for at least the past five years.

This year’s event focused primarily on opposing a 50% proposed cut in institutional assistance grants, maintaining funding of PHEAA grant program, and growing the Ready to Succeed Scholarship program to benefit more middle-income students.

Tomkiewicz and Sanchez spent the day meeting with staff members from the offices of Rep. Brad Roae, Rep. Mike Schlossberg, Rep. Peter Schweyer, Sen. Michele Brooks, Sen. Pat Browne, and Gov. Tom Wolf. At each meeting, they handed out fact sheets and information detailing how financial assistance helps students at private colleges and universities, including Allegheny, and the return on investment in higher education.

For Sanchez, an 18-year-old economics major from Allentown, Pennsylvania, the issue is a personal one. (more…)

Mattiace to Discuss Mexican Drug Cartels, Violence

Shannan Mattiace will explore “Indigenous Resistance to Drug Violence in Mexico,” as part of the Karl Weiss Faculty Lecture Series. The talk will be held on Wednesday, March 8, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center. It is free and open to the public.

Mattiace is the chair of the Political Science Department at Allegheny, with a focus on Latin America. She is currently working with Guillermo Trejo, an associate professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, and Sandra Ley, assistant professor at the Center for Economic Research in Mexico City, to shed light on what experiences within indigenous communities facilitate resistance to criminal organizations, in the hope that policy changes will ensue.

The talk will take a closer look at Mexico’s inter-cartel wars, as well as overall levels of violence, and the connection to the drug trade. Mattiace’s project draws on fieldwork done in Chihuahua and Guerrero to contrast the two cities. Guerrero is an area with an empowered indigenous community which enables them to deter drug cartels, while Chihuahua has a weaker indigenous mobilizing network, which was easily penetrated by the drug trade and now suffers from turf wars in the community.

The Karl Weiss Faculty Lecture Series hosts seven to eight lectures per year by faculty members from various departments with the intent to represent the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.

Allegheny College’s Mattiace to Discuss Mexican Drug Cartels, Violence

Shannan Mattiace will explore “Indigenous Resistance to Drug Violence in Mexico,” as part of the Karl Weiss Faculty Lecture Series. The talk will be held on Wednesday, March 8, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center. It is free and open to the public.

Mattiace is the chair of the Political Science Department at Allegheny, with a focus on Latin America. She is currently working with Guillermo Trejo, an associate professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, and Sandra Ley, assistant professor at the Center for Economic Research in Mexico City, to shed light on what experiences within indigenous communities facilitate resistance to criminal organizations, in the hope that policy changes will ensue. (more…)

Ready to Run Program Ignites Allegheny Students’ Interest in Public Service

Students who participated in Ready to Run

Seven Allegheny College students explored what it takes to pursue careers in public service by participating in Ready to Run Pittsburgh, a bipartisan training program to encourage women to seek government leadership positions.

The students attended the Feb. 4 workshop through financial support from the College’s Career Education office and Jennifer Daurora, a 1999 Allegheny graduate who serves on the College’s Board of Trustees. “There are not nearly enough women in politics in both parties,” she said. And when Daurora learned that Chatham University would be hosting Ready to Run, she saw an opportunity to help Allegheny students take part.

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Mattiace’s essays, guide published

Professor of Political Science and International Studies Shannan Mattiace is the continuing editor of the Mexican Politics section of the Library of Congress’s Handbook of Latin American Studies. Volume 71 has just been published, which includes her select and annotated guide to recent publications in Mexican politics and accompanying essay on trends in the field.

Allegheny College Students to Attend National Conference at Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics

Allegheny College students will participate in the National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement conference at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), February 3-5.

The 2017 National Campaign conference will focus on identifying the root causes of national divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election and work to formulate strategies to bridge gaps between all Americans. Student ambassadors and staff members from 28 colleges and universities across the country will convene on the Harvard campus with the mission to create a nationally coordinated program to Reconnect America.

Allegheny students Jesse Tomkiewicz and Hannah Firestone will attend the conference along with Dr. Patrick Jackson, visiting assistant professor of History and Philosophy and Religious Studies.

“The conference presents a unique opportunity for tomorrow’s leaders to have a vitally important discussion about divisiveness in our country and how we as a nation can best move forward with civility and respect for all,” said Allegheny College President James H. Mullen, Jr. (more…)