Living Learning Communities

What is a Living-Learning Community?

llc-logoA Living-Learning Community (LLC) is a unique first year residence hall space that connects the living environment with the academic experience. LLCs house new students in specially designated FS 101 courses together in the same residence hall floor. New first year students who choose an LLC will have the opportunity to build unique relationships within a community that will encourage deeper connections both in the residence hall and in the classroom.

Because residence hall staff supporting LLCs work collaboratively with FS advisors, there are also opportunities for creative programs that complement your FS 101 classroom experience. Students who have been in previous LLCs praise them for providing a sense of community, extra support in the transition to college, and additional opportunities to get involved in campus life during the first year.

Students interested in joining a Living-Learning Community for the 2017-2018 academic year must complete the application form by May 31, 2017.

Things to Consider

  • Enrolling in an LLC means that you will be pre-registered for your FS class. Other students will choose an FS class during summer registration. You will have peace of mind; they will have a wider range of topics from which to choose.
  • It’s a great way to make connections with faculty and classmates. You live and attend FS class with 13-16 other students. While you get to know them well and see them every day, you will also have two or three classes with other students.
  • Some LLC classes include activities outside of the normal class meeting. In the past, these activities have included community service, field trips, movie screenings, and social activities.
  • If you choose to apply for the LLC program, we will guarantee you one of your top three choices.  Be sure to choose three that you would like to take as you will be enrolled in one of them.
  • Fall athletes sometimes have difficulty balancing the outside activities with their practice and game schedule.
  • Athletes should also keep in mind that they will be living with their FS class rather than with a teammate (unless you both sign up for the same class).
  • LLC students are housed in single-gender double rooms located on co-ed floors with single gender bathrooms

What LLC participants are Saying

  • 95% of students who took an LLC would strongly recommend it to new students.
  • 83% feel it helped them engage more with the Allegheny community.
  • 95% felt the LLC had a positive impact on their academic performance.
  • 83% felt it helped them develop friendships with their peers.

Our LLC alumni have also shared these comments about their experience

  • “The LLC experience is definitely one that I would recommend. It is the best way to get the full experience of freshman year.”
  • “Being part of an LLC definitely helped make my experience better in the beginning of freshman year.  It helped me transition into college, with friends automatically to help out.”
  • “I think over all it was a great opportunity and it definitely helped me to feel more comfortable at Allegheny until I could branch out and establish my own friendship and activities.”
  • “It puts a group of people who are nervous and don’t know what to expect into a tightly knit group of good friends that encourage academic and personal growth.”
  • “I’m a shy person so living and learning with my peers was helpful.”
  • “The LLC experience is definitely one that I would recommend. It is the best way to get the full experience of freshman year.”
  • “LLC helps you get to know your floormates and guarantees that you will have someone to talk to who will eventually become a friend.”
  • “LLC is great with making new friends and it helped my academics hugely.”
  • “I had a positive experience living in a LLC because of the friendships and relationships that I made as a result.  The LLC allowed us to interact with each other and talk about topics that we were discussing in class.”

What are this year’s LLCs?

FS 101 Section 2 Education, Culture, and Democracy: What is My Responsibility?  Professor Weisman

An examination of educational approaches that foster or inhibit democratic participation. Students explore basic questions that underlie learned assumptions concerning freedom and oppression. We draw on educational theory to examine how social justice attitudes are developed. Our inquiry addresses civil rights and democracy in the U.S. as well as issues of power and justice in a neoliberal world. Class activities may include a Service-Learning component. Coursework emphasizes the development of effective oral and written communication skills with a focus on description, summary, and critical thinking.

FS 101 Section 5 Modern Sexualities  Professor Hellwarth

Sexuality and sexual identities are represented, defined, and circumscribed by our culture in a variety of ways. As a means for understanding this negotiation we examine human sexual behavior, femininity and masculinity, transsexuality, intersexuality, bisexuality, and homosexuality from scientific as well as popular perspectives. Readings are drawn from fields that both challenge and complement one another, including biology, psychology, art, and literature. Topics of discussion include sexual identity formation, infant sex reassignment surgery, and popular representations of masculinity and femininity. Coursework emphasizes the development of effective oral and written communication skills with a focus on description, summary, and critical thinking.

FS 101 Section 23 Water, Food, and Energy: What’s Next?  Professor O’Brien

A study of fresh water supplies, food systems, and energy resources from an interdisciplinary perspective. We examine these systems at the local, national, and global scales and identify how these natural resources are inherently linked in human societies. How well do we understand the dynamics among our water, agriculture, and energy supplies? How might we create policies to effectively manage these resources in tandem? What are the emerging ideas under development to meet our growing needs for water, food and/or energy? Coursework emphasizes the development of effective oral and written communication skills with a focus on description, summary, and critical thinking.

FS 101 Section 25: Natural Resource Conservation  Professor Bowden

An investigation of natural resource use and conservation. Northwest Pennsylvania has a diversity of natural resources that provide environmental and economic opportunities to the region. We examine protection and management of forests, farms, wildlife, streams, and wetlands, as well as the economic and social concerns that challenge informed use and long-term protection of valuable resources. In this laboratory and field-based class, students can expect to spend a considerable amount of time outdoors in the diversity of weather enjoyed by this region. Coursework emphasizes the development of effective oral and written communication skills with a focus on description, summary, and critical thinking.

FS 101 Section 35 Change your mind, change the world?  Professor Wesoky

An exploration of Buddhism and mindfulness and their impact on science, society, politics, and daily life. Scientific approaches include attention to neuroscientific research on meditation and mindfulness and their effects on mental and physical well-being. This understanding of the effects of Buddhist philosophy and meditative practices is extended through the ways that mindfulness is manifested in the world. Topics of study include Buddhist approaches to economics and the consumer economy, war and peace, and the environment.  Students are also given resources and information to create their own mindfulness practice. Coursework emphasizes the development of effective oral and written communication skills with a focus on description, summary, and critical thinking.

 

I Want to Choose an LLC!

Apply to Join an LLC

If you have any questions about Living-Learning Communities, please contact us at (814) 332-2898, or orientation@allegheny.edu.