Allegheny Sophomore Attends Democracy Forum in Greece

It’s one thing to have classroom discussions about the challenges facing democracy.

It’s quite another to have those same discussions in the country where democracy was born.

Allegheny College sophomore Jesse Tomkiewicz was one of 23 students representing 11 different countries who participated in the Athens Democracy Forum in Athens, Greece, in September. The goal of the annual forum, hosted by The New York Times, is to bring students together from around the globe at the American College of Greece to discuss the challenges facing democracy that year. Students work together in teams to write a white paper on the chosen challenges, this year, climate change and inequality.

The different backgrounds, experiences, viewpoints and ideologies of the participants — and how those differences shaped the discussions — was eye-opening, said Tomkiewicz, a political science and philosophy double major from rural Freeport, Pennsylvania.

“It was an incredibly diverse group,” he said. “That was probably the most valuable part of the experience, talking to people from all over the world.”

Being with like-minded students interested in talking about and shaping the future of democracy — in Athens, of all places — was exhilarating, he said.

“This is about going to a place where I’m with a dream team,” of fellow participants, Tomkiewicz said. “These individuals are not just really bright; these are some of the best students I’ve been around. It was truly intellectually challenging.

“I benefitted more than anyone at the conference because I (had) never left the U.S. Here I focus on the judicial process and political theory. I had no experience in international politics. … I learned more in those nine days (in Athens) than I would have taking a semester’s worth of classes.”

The trip was one of many firsts, including Tomkiewicz’s first plane ride out of the country. He swam in the Aegean Sea, attended a speech by former Secretary General of the United Nations Kofi Annan, and stood at the top of the Acropolis.

“It was enchanting being on top of the Acropolis, knowing that people like Socrates had physically been there,” he said. “I’m from a country where our history is a few centuries. We’re talking about a place that goes thousands of years back. Being in a place with that kind of history, that was really something.”

Tomkiewicz is already heavily involved in campus and local politics — he’s the vice president of Allegheny’s College Democrats and a field director for the Crawford County Democratic Party — but left the conference wanting to do more to further democracy, particularly for voters in rural places like his hometown.

“There has to be grassroots, bottom-up efforts” to address the challenges facing rural voters, Tomkiewicz said.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Professor to Speak on Governing Rural America

Allegheny College Assistant Professor of Political Science Zachary Callen will speak on “Governing Rural America: Political Change and Limited Resources’” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 8, in the Campus Center Room 301/302. The lecture is free and open to the public.
Callen will discuss the problems with which rural communities struggle, which range from deindustrialization and depopulation to the opioid epidemic. His presentation will address the ways in which local government in rural locations struggle to provide services and grow their economy. Based around a series of interviews with leaders from a small rural community, the project tries to grapple with the question of how communities decline gracefully.

The address is part of the 2017-18 Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series, which features professors from various departments representing the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Professor to Speak on Governing Rural America

Allegheny College Assistant Professor of Political Science Zachary Callen will speak on “Governing Rural America: Political Change and Limited Resources’” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 8, in the Campus Center Room 301/302. The lecture is free and open to the public.
Callen will discuss the problems with which rural communities struggle, which range from deindustrialization and depopulation to the opioid epidemic. His presentation will address the ways in which local government in rural locations struggle to provide services and grow their economy. Based around a series of interviews with leaders from a small rural community, the project tries to grapple with the question of how communities decline gracefully.

The address is part of the 2017-18 Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series, which features professors from various departments representing the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Zachary Callen (Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series)

Allegheny College Assistant Professor of Political Science Zachary Callen will speak on “Governing Rural America: Political Change and Limited Resources’” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 8, in the Campus Center Room 301/302. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Callen will discuss the problems with which rural communities struggle, which range from
deindustrialization and depopulation to the opioid epidemic. His presentation will address the ways in which local government in rural locations struggle to provide services and grow their economy. Based around a series of interviews with leaders from a small rural community, the project tries to grapple with the question of how communities decline gracefully.

The address is part of the 2017-18 Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series, which features professors from various departments representing the diversity of scholarship at Allegheny.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny’s Center for Political Participation Featured on Civic Engagement Education Website

Allegheny College’s Center for Political Participation (CPP), under the direction of Political Science Professor Brian Harward, has been chosen as the first “civic engagement center” to be featured on a special website that focuses on teaching civic engagement.

Elizabeth C. Matto, associate research professor and director of the Center for Youth Political Participation and Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University, reached out to Harward as a result of the success of the CPP and the new Law & Policy Program.

The website is meant to serve as a companion to the volumes “Teaching Civic Engagement: From Student to Active Citizen” and “Teaching Civic Engagement across the Disciplines.” On the site, visitors can find examples of how the authors included methods of teaching active citizenship into their curriculum and can reference such items as sample syllabi, class projects and assessments.

The site also is intended to be an ongoing resource for educators and will be updated with how-to guides for incorporating methods of instruction to foster active citizenship, spotlights of civic engagement research and programming, and interactive platforms that will allow visitors to make comments and offer suggestions.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny’s Center for Political Participation Featured on Civic Engagement Education Website

Allegheny College’s Center for Political Participation (CPP), under the direction of Political Science Professor Brian Harward, has been chosen as the first “civic engagement center” to be featured on a special website that focuses on teaching civic engagement.

Elizabeth C. Matto, associate research professor and director of the Center for Youth Political Participation and Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University, reached out to Harward as a result of the success of the CPP and the new Law & Policy Program.

The website is meant to serve as a companion to the volumes “Teaching Civic Engagement: From Student to Active Citizen” and “Teaching Civic Engagement across the Disciplines.” On the site, visitors can find examples of how the authors included methods of teaching active citizenship into their curriculum and can reference such items as sample syllabi, class projects and assessments.

The site also is intended to be an ongoing resource for educators and will be updated with how-to guides for incorporating methods of instruction to foster active citizenship, spotlights of civic engagement research and programming, and interactive platforms that will allow visitors to make comments and offer suggestions.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Mattiace Attends Research Workshop

Professor of Political Science Shannan Mattiace attended a research workshop on September 21 and 22 sponsored by the Kellogg Center for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame and the Latin American Research Review (LARR) on Societal Responses to Criminal Violence in Latin America with co-authors Guillermo Trejo and Sandra Ley.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Mattiace Attends Research Workshop

Professor of Political Science Shannan Mattiace attended a research workshop on September 21 and 22 sponsored by the Kellogg Center for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame and the Latin American Research Review (LARR) on Societal Responses to Criminal Violence in Latin America with co-authors Guillermo Trejo and Sandra Ley.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Wesoky Publishes Book Examining Political Humor in China

Professor of Political Science Sharon Wesoky recently published a book, co-edited with Kingfai Tam of Hong Kong Polytechnic University, titled “Not Just a Laughing Matter: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Political Humor in China (Springer Humanities).” The book, a product of a multi-year collaboration, grant from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, and international conference in Hong Kong, collects the work of 12 international scholars to examine the role of multiple genres of political humor in China from the late Imperial period to the present day. Wesoky also recently was invited to contribute a piece to the inaugural “Women and Gender in China” blog. Her article, “(Dis)continuities in Chinese feminisms: navigating local and global” can be found at https://www.wagic.org/blank-2/2017/08/29/Discontinuities-in-Chinese-Feminisms-Navigating-Local-and-Global.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Wesoky Publishes Book Examining Political Humor in China

Professor of Political Science Sharon Wesoky recently published a book, co-edited with Kingfai Tam of Hong Kong Polytechnic University, titled “Not Just a Laughing Matter: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Political Humor in China (Springer Humanities).” The book, a product of a multi-year collaboration, grant from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, and international conference in Hong Kong, collects the work of 12 international scholars to examine the role of multiple genres of political humor in China from the late Imperial period to the present day. Wesoky also recently was invited to contribute a piece to the inaugural “Women and Gender in China” blog. Her article, “(Dis)continuities in Chinese feminisms: navigating local and global” can be found at https://www.wagic.org/blank-2/2017/08/29/Discontinuities-in-Chinese-Feminisms-Navigating-Local-and-Global.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research