Senior Paul Cancilla and Professor Shannan Mattiace Do Fieldwork in Mexico City

Paul Cancilla ’16 and Professor of Political Science and International Studies Shannan Mattiace traveled to Mexico City in January for a week of fieldwork. Paul is writing a Senior Project on the relationship between public space and democracy in one Mexico City neighborhood. Professor Mattiace, who is involved in a multi-year Great Lakes Colleges Association project on Mexico City, is looking at citizenship responses to insecurity in the city.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Wesoky Presents at Symposium on Gender and Transnational Identities in Contemporary Asia

Professor of Political Science Sharon Wesoky was an invited presenter at the Symposium on Gender and Transnational Identities in Contemporary Asia at the University of Illinois-Champaign Urbana. Professor Wesoky spoke on “Feminism Becomes Neoliberalism: Reflections on Two Decades of Feminist Resistances in Globalizing China.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Senior Abby Lombard Chosen for House Legislative Program

AbigailLombard (2)

Dec. 2, 2015 – Allegheny College senior Abby Lombard, of Syracuse, New York, has been awarded a Pennsylvania House Legislative Fellowship for 13 weeks beginning Jan. 12, 2016.

The highly competitive fellowship program places students in leadership offices, such as offices of committee chairmen, in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. As one of the only legislative fellows this year to be placed on two committees, Lombard will be working with the Veterans Affairs/Emergency Preparedness and the Transportation committees.

The program provides fellows with access to weekly workshops with key thinkers, planners and decision makers. Fellows also attend committee hearings and meetings as well as House Sessions. The final project for each fellow is to research, draft and present a piece of legislation.

“My dream is to enter into the political world and eventually get into government service,” says Lombard, a history and political science double major and philosophy minor. “I’ve worked for a congressman and for local government, but I’ve never had state experience. I believe I can really benefit from this.”

“This fellowship is the perfect culmination of all the work Abby has been doing here,” says Patrick Jackson, visiting professor of religious studies and history at Allegheny who also mentors students who are applying for nationally competitive awards and fellowships. “This will bring all her experiences and knowledge together in a real-world way, not to mention the up-close, behind-the-scenes access she’s going to get to Pennsylvania lawmakers. Beyond that, she’ll also get experience being a legislator. Abby has political aspirations, so the sooner she gets used to turning ideas into policy, the better.”

During her time at Allegheny, Lombard has served as a student Fellow for Allegheny College’s Center for Political Participation. In September 2014, she traveled to Harvard University to represent Allegheny at the Bipartisan National Conference, and in spring 2015, she spent the semester studying in Australia. She is a member of Alpha Phi Omega, the college’s service fraternity; executive board president of the Residence Hall Association; student advisory board member for the Department of History; and student representative on the History and Heritage Committee.

In summer 2014, Lombard completed an internship at the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown, New York. In 2015, she interned with Congressman John Katko in Syracuse. She also has worked in the Office of the Onondaga County Executive in Syracuse.

Following graduation, Lombard has accepted a position with Deloitte Consulting in Cleveland and eventually plans to attend graduate school and run for office.

The Legislative Fellowship Program was created in 1982 by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, through the Bipartisan Management Committee. Since 1982, nearly 400 students have participated in the program, and approximately 30 percent have found employment in state government.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Senior Abigail Lombard Awarded House Legislative Fellowship

Abigail Lombard ’16 has been awarded the Pennsylvania House of Representatives Legislative Fellowship for the spring semester.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Mattiace Publishes in “Estudios Sociológicos”

An article by Professor of Political Science Shannan Mattiace has been published in one of Mexico’s top-ranked journals in the field of sociology. Professor Mattiace co-authored the article, “Reformas Multiculturales para los mayas de Yucatán,” with Rodrigo Llanes. The article can be found in Estudios Sociológicos 33.99.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Mattiace Publishes in Flagship Journal of Latin American Studies Association

Professor of Political Science Shannan Mattiace published a research note titled “Yucatec Maya Organizations in San Francisco, California: Ethnic Identity Formation across Migrant Generations” with co-author Patricia Fortuny in the Latin American Research Review (LARR) 50.2 (summer 2015). LARR is the flagship journal of the Latin American Studies Association. Professor Mattiace presented her paper “Criminal Violence and Indigenous Communities in Mexico: Civil Resistance in the Face of Narcotraffickers” (Violencia Criminal y Comunidades Indígenas en México: La resistencia civil frente al narcotráfico) at the Latin American Political Science Association Meetings in Lima, Peru in July.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Harward To Give Talk on “The Voting Rights Act after Shelby Co. v. Holder”

Brian M. Harward, associate professor of political science and director of the Center for Political Participation, will present “The Voting Rights Act after Shelby Co. v. Holder” on May 5 as part of the proceedings of the Western New York Continuing Legal Education Seminar at the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown, New York.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny Experience Shapes Pursuit for Prestigious Award

JR1

John Rooney ’14 one of 43 Americans to receive 2015 Humanity in Action Fellowship

“The issue of human rights has been an interest of mine,” says John Rooney ’14.

Rooney, who majored in political science and minored in black studies at Allegheny, will now be able to pursue that interest, as he has been named one of 43 American recipients of the prestigious 2015 Humanity in Action Fellowship.

Rooney and the rest of the 2015 American Fellows will join students and recent graduates from universities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Poland and Ukraine to participate in the Humanity in Action Fellowship in Europe. The Fellowship will take place in Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Paris and Warsaw from May 25 to June 28, 2015. Rooney, who resides in Austin, Texas, will travel to Copenhagen.

This is the first time Allegheny has had a Humanity in Action Fellow. The Fellows are selected on a highly competitive basis for their high academic standing, active civic participation in human rights issues and outstanding recommendations. Humanity in Action received a record 688 applications from 253 American colleges and universities for the 2015 Fellowship. Humanity in Action supports all Fellows financially for the duration of their programs, allowing for the merit-based selection of diverse applicants. Read more.

Rooney shared more about this opportunity and how Allegheny helped to develop his passion for human rights:

How did you learn about the HiA fellowship?
I learned about it through Professor Brian Harward, associate professor of political science and director of the Center for Political Participation. I had been talking with Patrick Jackson, nationally competitive awards adviser and visiting professor of religious studies and history, about applying for a different fellowship, so I went ahead and worked with him to apply for this one, too.

What about this fellowship appealed to you?
The issue of human rights has been an interest of mine. I was fortunate to take a number of classes at Allegheny where it was in my mind many times. What appealed to me about this fellowship in particular was the opportunity to get together with a very diverse group of people that brings together such heavy people in terms of intellectuals and activists and others leading in the field of human rights. Those interactions and discussions are something I’m looking forward to. I’ve never been significantly out of the country, so the opportunity to go to Europe with others my age to discuss these issues with such leading thinkers is so exciting.

What did you have to do to apply for the fellowship?
I had to write three essays, where brevity was required in each one. Two of them needed to be less than 500 words and one had to be less than 150. It was an exercise in clarity and conciseness; it was all about distilling what I had to say down to the bare bones. I feel that the process of writing, rewriting and revising my comp at Allegheny was really helpful when writing these essays. My writing definitely improved through my experience at Allegheny.

How did you learn that you had been chosen as an HiA fellow?
I got a call from the executive director and founder of HiA. I had just gotten on a bus to go see a film!

When do you leave for the fellowship experience?
I leave May 25 to go to a three-day orientation in Washington, D.C. Then I will fly to Copenhagen!

How did Allegheny play a role in inspiring you to apply for this fellowship?
One of the classes I took at Allegheny was a new course about exploring difference. It was a fascinating class that brought together people from a lot of different majors, as well as 12 or 16 faculty members from across the disciplinary range. That started me down the path that led to my black studies minor.

From my classes at Allegheny, one thing that keyed me into this interest is the idea that none of us is truly free unless all of us are truly free. Dr. Martin Luther King’s quote “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” has stuck with me and has been engrained in me. It’s up to all of us to make sure everyone has that space to be safe and has equal opportunity to reach their potential. We shouldn’t have different opportunities because of the color of our skin or the family we’re born into. Those ideas resonated with me.

I have to give a shout-out to Allegheny for giving me the opportunity to pursue studies in such a broad area. That was one thing I loved at Allegheny; I wasn’t tied in one box. It gave me the opportunity to think of things from such a wide range of viewpoints.

I also need to thank several other people from Allegheny: Steven Farrelly-Jackson, associate professor of philosophy; Jackie Gehring, assistant professor of political science; Brian Harward; Kazi Joshua, former associate dean and director of the Center for Intercultural Advancement and Student Success; Bill Bywater, emeritus professor of philosophy and religious studies; Bruce Smith, professor of political science; Patrick Jackson; Andy Bloeser, assistant professor of political science; Laura Quinn, professor emerita of political science, and Kate Darby, former assistant professor of environmental science. They all influenced how I conceive of civic life, democracy and justice.

What do you hope to gain from this experience?
I hope to gain an expanded understanding and appreciation of the issues that come from being around a diverse group of students and thinkers. The other thing is an insight about how I want to take this passion of mine and use it in my life. I’m still discerning my own path, so I’m excited for the opportunity to meet new people and to see how they’ve used their interest in human rights in their lives.

I’m also thinking about graduate school. I’m looking at this experience to help me plan my trajectory.

Overall, I hope to learn how to use my voice in the movement to make the world a better place. That’s been all I’ve been after for a while now.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Graduate One of 43 Americans to Receive 2015 Humanity in Action Fellowship

JR1

April 22, 2015 – John Rooney, an Allegheny College class of 2014 alumnus, has been named one of 43 American recipients of the prestigious 2015 Humanity in Action Fellowship.

Rooney and the rest of the 2015 American Fellows will join students and recent graduates from universities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Poland and Ukraine to participate in the Humanity in Action Fellowship in Europe. The Fellowship will take place in Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Paris and Warsaw from May 25 to June 28, 2015. Rooney, who resides in Austin, Texas, will travel to Copenhagen.

“The issue of human rights has been an interest of mine. What appealed to me about this fellowship was the opportunity to get together with a very diverse group of people that brings together such heavy people in terms of intellectuals and activists and others leading in the field of human rights,” says Rooney, who majored in political science and minored in black studies at Allegheny. “I’ve never been significantly out of the country, so the opportunity to go to Europe with others my age to discuss these issues with such leading thinkers is exciting.” 

“The Humanity in Action Fellowship is a good fit for anyone interested in human rights work, international affairs and community organizing,” says Patrick Jackson, visiting professor of religious studies and history who works with students who are applying to external fellowships. “It’s an intensive program that seems to have a profound effect on the people who participate in it.”

This is the first time Allegheny has had a Humanity in Action Fellow. The Fellows are selected on a highly competitive basis for their high academic standing, active civic participation in human rights issues and outstanding recommendations. Humanity in Action received a record 688 applications from 253 American colleges and universities for the 2015 Fellowship. Humanity in Action supports all Fellows financially for the duration of their programs, allowing for the merit-based selection of diverse applicants. These young leaders are dynamic, entrepreneurial and passionate about changing the world.

The Humanity in Action Fellowship is highly interdisciplinary and features daily lectures and discussions with renowned academics, journalists, politicians and activists, as well as site visits to government agencies, nonprofit and community organizations, museums and memorials. The programs seek to highlight different models of action to remedy injustice relating to diverse societies.

The 2015 American Fellows will participate in an orientation workshop in Washington, D.C., from May 25 to May 28, 2015. The orientation will focus on American civil rights, Holocaust education and European security and political issues. It will also feature sessions devoted to advising Humanity in Action Fellows on building careers in the field of foreign affairs.

This year’s Fellowship will come to a close at the Sixth Annual Humanity in Action International Conference in The Hague from June 25 to June 28, 2015. The 2015 Fellows from all program cities will convene in The Hague to explore the city’s unique promotion of international peace, justice and reconciliation.

Since 1999, Humanity in Action has engaged more than 1,500 Fellows in its transatlantic study programs focusing on human rights and minority issues—past and present—in Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland and the United States. Humanity in Action Fellows have used the knowledge gained in the programs and inspiration from one another to make a difference in public service, journalism, medicine, law, education, the arts, business and grassroots action. Humanity in Action’s unique international network of leaders is a valuable resource to policy-makers, diplomats, educators, business leaders and civic-minded individuals and organizations.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Wesoky Publishes Article in “Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society”

Professor of Political Science Sharon Wesoky’s article “Bringing the Jia Back into Guojia: Engendering Chinese Intellectual Politics” has been published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, in a thematic cluster on “Feminist Sinologies.” The article examines the silences on gender questions in contemporary Chinese intellectual criticism and argues that the greatest critical promise in contemporary mainstream Chinese critical thought lies both in clearer engagement with feminism and in an emphasis on the gendered resonances within this critical thought.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research