FS 201 Descriptions (Fall 2021)

FS 201 courses complete the required FS sequence and also count for elective credit in the department offering the course. Because FS 201 forms a bridge between the first-year FS courses and the Junior Seminar, students are expected to take FS 201 in the sophomore year. Some majors and minors require an FS 201 course in that specific program; in these cases, the same FS 201 course may be used to satisfy both the FS requirement and the major/minor requirement.

Please consult Self-Service to confirm the days, times, and locations of these sections.

FSBIO 201 01, Investigative Approaches in Bio
Professor Kadmiel
4 Credits
An investigative laboratory course that emphasizes experimental design, modern experimental techniques and instrumentation, analysis and interpretation of data, and written and oral presentation. The course consists of three multi-week project modules designed to illustrate investigative approaches at different levels of biological organization-molecular/cellular, organismal/physiology, and population/ecosystem. There is an emphasis on independent and cooperative laboratory/field work, and on writing and speaking in the sciences. Two 3-hour meetings per week.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: BIO 220.
This course is required for Biology majors and minors.

FSBIO 201 01, Investigative Approaches in Bio
Professor Whitenack, L
4 Credits
An investigative laboratory course that emphasizes experimental design, modern experimental techniques and instrumentation, analysis and interpretation of data, and written and oral presentation. The course consists of three multi-week project modules designed to illustrate investigative approaches at different levels of biological organization-molecular/cellular, organismal/physiology, and population/ecosystem. There is an emphasis on independent and cooperative laboratory/field work, and on writing and speaking in the sciences. Two 3-hour meetings per week.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: BIO 220.
This course is required for Biology majors and minors.

FSCHE 201 00, Research Methods in Chemistry
Professor Chapp
4 Credits
An introduction to writing, speaking, and research methods in the discipline of chemistry. Topics include experimental design, statistical analysis of data, ethical conduct of research and selected classical, spectroscopic and chromatographic methods of analysis. Analytical techniques are discussed in the context of laboratory projects that are designed, performed, and interpreted by the class. Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CHEM 122.

FSCOM 201 00, The Stories We Tell
Professsor Sinha Roy
4 Credits
An exploration of powerful storytelling examples across multimedia platforms. As emerging scholars in Communication & Cultural Studies and Theatre, we will use interdisciplinary perspectives to consider how various audiences and persuasive agendas affect narrative design and produce new ways of looking. Drawing from diverse sources, students critically challenge, in informed ways, what novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie describes as the dangers of a single story. Students will develop their abilities in scaffolding research, constructing thoughtful and thought-provoking arguments for various publics and developing professional presentation and written communication skills.
This course may be counted toward the major or minor in Communication & Cultural Studies.
Prerequisite: Completion of FS 102

FSECO 201 00, Fraud and Business Ethics
Professor Waugh
4 Credits
Fraud by employees costs business trillions of dollars globally each year. We will explore the elements of theories about fraud, the role of whistleblowers, internal and external controls, the characteristics of fraudsters and victim organizations as well as different fraud schemes. We will examine how fraud actors are able to work alongside their counterparts while victimizing their employer at the same time. FBI reports and biographical accounts of fraudsters as well as fraud documentaries, scholarly articles, and interactive fraud investigation educational tools will be utilized.

FSENG 201 00, Books, Publishing, and the Cultivation of Literary Community
Professor Ferrence
4 Credits
An introduction to literary methods as a set of tools for considering the choices and processes involved in the writing, publishing, and public discourse surrounding serious books and literature. Students read and analyze texts about the history of the book, the craft of publishing, and the art of book reviews to explore the place of literature in our shared public consciousness. Considerations include the economy of literature and the practical concerns of print culture.

FSENV 201 01, Environmental Problem Analysis
Professor B. Davis
4 Credits
An interdisciplinary analysis of modern controversial environmental issues. Students examine scientific, economic, cultural and political underpinnings of issues. Areas of study address environmental degradation, natural resource use and misuse, human-environmental interactions, and environmental justice. Written assignments and oral arguments and presentations are emphasized.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: ENVSC 110.

FSENV 201 01, Environmental Problem Analysis
Professor D. Byrnes
4 Credits
An interdisciplinary analysis of modern controversial environmental issues. Students examine scientific, economic, cultural and political underpinnings of issues. Areas of study address environmental degradation, natural resource use and misuse, human-environmental interactions, and environmental justice. Written assignments and oral arguments and presentations are emphasized.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: ENVSC 110.

FSENV 201 01, Environmental Problem Analysis
Professor E. Bethurem
4 Credits
An interdisciplinary analysis of modern controversial environmental issues. Students examine scientific, economic, cultural and political underpinnings of issues. Areas of study address environmental degradation, natural resource use and misuse, human-environmental interactions, and environmental justice. Written assignments and oral arguments and presentations are emphasized.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: ENVSC 110.

FSGEO 201 00, Field Geology
Professor K. Tamulonis
4 Credits
Applied principles and field methods in geology and environmental geology. Students are exposed to critical analysis and communication in the geosciences through field and laboratory projects involving topographic maps, aerial photographs, geologic maps, rock and soil properties, subsurface drilling and geophysical data, and computer applications. Geologic mapping and hazards, landfill siting, environmental pollution, and oil exploration issues provide context for the projects. May include a multi-day field trip. Field work or laboratory, one period.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.

FSGHS 201 0, Topics and Approaches in Global Health
Professor P. Runestad
4 Credits
An introduction to writing and speaking in the discipline of Global Health Studies. Students are introduced to the research methods and modes of communication used in the field of global health and use case studies to investigate different approaches to identifying, analyzing, and responding to global health issues. We read primary and secondary research, interpret data, evaluate tools for communicating effectively to different audiences, and explore various research methods. Ethical, cultural, and interdisciplinary dimensions of global health research and work are emphasized throughout.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.
Prerequisite: GHS 130.

FSHIS 201 00, The American Dream
Professor Ribeiro
4 Credits
An introduction to research, writing, and speaking in the discipline of history. Students approach historical thinking by considering the notion of the American Dream. The course focuses on skills central to producing historical accounts as students explore ideas about changing societal values in the United States and representations of American diversity.

FSPHY 201 00, Investigative Approaches in Physics
Professor Willey
An investigative laboratory course that emphasizes experimental design and analysis, interpretation of data, and written and oral presentation. This course stresses independent and cooperative laboratory work. Writing and speaking in the physical sciences is emphasized through written, oral and poster presentations.
Must be taken on the letter-grade basis.