The Ella Nash Society

Ella Nash Society Spring 2017

Inspiring Women, Informing Philanthropy

This newsletter is dedicated to women’s philanthropy and the celebration of Allegheny’s alumnae and friends who are making life better in their communities and on campus. The newsletter is named for M. Ella Nash, Class of 1873, the College’s first female graduate.


Fall 2017

A Life of Giving Becomes a Legacy

Judy Berges ’63 – A Woman of Modest Means Who Made a Difference

Judy Berges ’63 filled many roles during her life: She was a daughter, a friend, a student, a teacher, a pastor, a part-time travel agent, and a philanthropist.

Judy, who lived humbly, passed away on February 28, 2017. Throughout her life, those who knew her say she firmly believed that you didn’t have to be wealthy to support charities and nonprofit organizations and to give freely of one’s time.

Judy donated to Allegheny for 38 consecutive years, and her legacy currently supports three initiatives at the College.

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Your Bequest: Your Values, Changing Lives

Judy Berges ’63 made a major contribution to the College’s $200 million bicentennial endowment campaign, Our Allegheny: Our Third Century Quest, by including her beloved alma mater in her estate plans. Judy wished to maintain most of her assets during her lifetime in order to cover her retirement and potential medical expenses. By naming the College the beneficiary of her individual retirement accounts (IRAs) and including a provision for Allegheny in her will, she was able to make a substantial gift at her death.

We welcomed Judy to the William Bentley Legacy Society (WBLS) when she documented her plans in 2012. The WBLS is named for Rev. Bentley, who bequeathed his library to the College in 1817. Bentley’s bequest provided the impetus to develop Bentley Hall to house the collection and fledgling college, thus solidifying its future. In a very real sense, Allegheny may be considered as much Bentley’s legacy as it is Timothy Alden’s.

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Philanthropy in Action: Angeline Sporrer ’18

For Angeline Sporrer ’18, springtime in Paris was, indeed, filled with love: for a language, culture, and city that she now regards as a second home. She spent 15 weeks in an immersive French language program that included taking liberal arts classes at Cité Universitaire and an eight-week internship at a non-governmental organization. Angie’s experience was possible, thanks in part, to a study away scholarship established by Judy Berges ’63. Angie returned to campus for her senior year this fall a stronger and more independent woman after having spent “the most amazing and hardest weeks [she had] ever experienced.” Judy would have been delighted.

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