Senior Projects Exhibit

The art galleries of Allegheny College will feature the work of seven graduating seniors from April 25 through May 7. The exhibit will open with a reception from 7 to 8 p.m. on April 25 in the galleries.

The reception and the exhibit are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday 12:30-4 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30-5 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Senior Projects Featured in Allegheny Student Art Exhibit

The art galleries of Allegheny College will feature the work of seven graduating seniors from April 25 through May 7. The exhibit will open with a reception from 7 to 8 p.m. on April 25 in the galleries.

The pieces on display will include a multimedia installation by Dave Ambroso, an art and technology major. Studio art major and psychology minor Madeline Becker creates an immersive sculpture focusing on the interconnection of political, industrial, social, and environmental landscapes in relation to oil, and Halie Gary, a studio art major, offers personal reflections upon African American “hair culture,” with historical and contemporary examples. Elizabeth Person’s studio art project, a video entitled Scaél Eitil (Flying Story), is an animated fable that takes place in an enchanted Irish setting. Jack Ohrman’s combined senior project in environmental studies and studio art is a speculative design study using robotics as a tool for environmental science research. Studio art major Christina Truwit makes minimalist sculptures created with found objects that question platonic ideals about both form and function. Jonathan Yee paints a series of images on glass to explore personal memory and geography for his major in studio art.

The reception and the exhibit are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday 12:30-4 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30-5 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

The Art Galleries, which are wheelchair accessible, are located in Doane Hall of Art, a wing of the Campus center, east of North Main Street between College and John
Streets in Meadville. For more information, call 814-332-4365 or visit www.allegheny.edu/artgalleries.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Kali Albern, a Member of Allegheny’s Class of 2017 — in Spirit

Kali Albern sketching

In a perfect world, Kali Albern ’17 would march across the stage at Allegheny College’s Commencement on May 13, happily accepting her bachelor’s degree as an art major.

Sadly, that won’t happen. Kali tragically died in August 2015 when she should have been preparing to return to campus for her junior year.

“Kali felt very connected to Allegheny,” says her mother, Sherri Albern. “She joined several clubs and had a lot of fun with the friends she made. When she was at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Headache and Facial Pain Clinic and was asked what she wanted to be able to do with her life, she responded, ‘Go back to Allegheny.’ Her last posts talked about her desire to go back to school.” 

Kali unexpectedly died while undergoing treatment for an intractable migraine (a migraine that doesn’t go away) that started in January 2015. “Two days after she transitioned, we got the results of a specialized EEG that showed that although her cerebral cortex was normal, some of the underlying brain structures were always ‘on,’” says her mother. “Her brain would never turn off and let her completely rest.”

To memorialize Kali and honor her work, the Alberns hosted an exhibition of her artwork at the public library in their hometown, Colorado Springs, Colorado, in November 2016. The exhibit included oil paintings, abstract photography and pencil drawings of people, fantasy and pets.

“We wanted to share Kali’s art,” her mother says. “Anyone who wanted a copy of any of the pieces was asked to donate to a charity of their choice. It was very gratifying to be able to show her art.”

While at Allegheny, Kali was known to have a sympathetic ear for all of her classmates who needed to talk about what was happening in their lives. In her obituary, it says: “Kali spent her life caring about people and helping others with their troubles and challenges. From preschool through high school she always went right up to new students and welcomed them with open arms. Even when she went to college and was not feeling well she was the go-to person for anyone with problems ranging from boyfriends or girlfriends to classroom work.”

Amara Geffen, Eila V. Bush Professor of Art, recalls Kali as a young woman committed to social justice. “I first met Kali when she enrolled in my FS 102 course in the second semester of her freshman year. The course, Vision and Activism, suited Kali’s sense of passion and purpose, and her keen ability to creatively critique cultural norms that she experienced as unjust and restrictive. Following the FS class, and through a series of studio art courses, Kali explored opportunities to integrate and hone her skills as an artist with her passion for social justice and equity. Watching these discoveries unfold for Kali was a gift she gave to us all,” Geffen said.

Artwork by Kali Albern (Click on the photo for a larger version.)

Classmate Emiranzala Kisyanto ’17 of Jakarta, Indonesia, remembers Kali as “stubborn in her beliefs, but that’s what made her charming. She was a wonderful person who I enjoyed spending time with, either watching some shows in her dorm room or hanging out with our other friends. Oh, she also would get pretty excited about the things she liked.”

Growing up, Kali did what most young girls do. She played soccer for several years. “She wasn’t much of a runner but she had fun loping down the field,” her mother recalls. She was in the Girl Scouts, enjoyed singing and learned to play several musical instruments in school. Most of all, she loved to read. “In elementary school, she’d literally walk down the hall with her nose in a book,” Sherri Albern says.

“Very early on, Kali was a talented artist,” her mother recalls. “She loved to draw and probably filled 20 or more sketchbooks. Art was her passion and a way to share her vision of the world.”

Kali decided to attend Allegheny after a campus visit that almost didn’t happen.

Says Sherri Albern: “She was looking for a small college where she’d feel like she would fit in. The east coast has a lot more choices in small, private schools than in Colorado. The phrase ‘a place where students with unusual combinations of interests, skills and talents excel’ really resonated with her. Despite that, when we did the family college tour we almost didn’t make the drive way out to western Pennsylvania. I’m sure glad we did because she loved Allegheny as soon as she got there.”

Kali used an alternate name on social media, Teyalora, and signed her art with a stylized “TL.”

Says Kali’s mother: “For those of us who knew her, these words embody her: artistic, authentic, caring, friend, individual, kind and loving.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Annual Art Show Features Work of Allegheny Students

The Annual Student Art Show will be held from April 4 to April 16 in the art galleries of Allegheny College. Students who wish to participate can drop off their work on Monday and Tuesday, March 27 and 28, from 11:30 to 4 p.m. An opening reception and awards ceremony will be Tuesday, April 4, from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.

This year’s show, which will feature works in a variety of media, is juried by John Vanco, Allegheny alumnus and director of the Erie Art Museum.
Doane Prizes in Art are awarded for a series or body of work in the categories of painting or drawing, sculpture or ceramics, and graphics (which includes prints, photographs, video and computer art). The award winners, who are selected by the art department faculty along with the outside juror, receive a cash award and an inscribed book. The Doane Prizes are provided through the generosity of the late Foster B. Doane, a former Allegheny College trustee.

Additionally, the art department faculty selects artwork to be purchased through the Doane Student Art Merit and Acquisitions Fund. These student works are acquired for public display at Allegheny or awarded a cash prize in cases where acquisition of the artwork would be impractical due to size or other constraints. The Doane Juror’s Awards are selected by the outside juror for outstanding individual works of art in the show.

In addition to the juried exhibition, a selection of works will be on display in the areas adjoining the galleries. This exhibition is organized by the Student Art Society as a “Salon des Refuses,” which is an art tradition of displaying alternative works not chosen by the jurors.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30 to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. The Art Galleries are located in the Doane Hall of Art on the Allegheny College campus, North Main Street, between College and John streets in Meadville. The art galleries are wheelchair accessible; gallery tours are available to groups by request. All events at the Allegheny College art galleries are free and open to the public. For more information, please call (814) 332-4365.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Annual Student Art Show

All Allegheny students are encouraged to submit their creative artworks to the Annual Student Art Show. Works are carefully chosen by a guest juror, and all accepted works are displayed in the galleries. Cash awards and other prizes are given for the best works in several categories.

Drop-off dates for artwork are Monday and Tuesday, March 27 and 28, from 11:30 to 4 p.m. The exhibition will open with a reception on Tuesday, April 4 from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. in the art galleries and continue through April 16.

Pictured is Senior Project in Art & Technology, Becca Anderson ’16

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

‘The Mystical Arts of Tibet’ Opens

Tibetan Buddhist monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery began their construction of a sand mandala during an opening ceremony in the art galleries of Allegheny College Tuesday afternoon. The Mystical Arts of Tibet program, part of Allegheny’s ongoing Year of Mindfulness, will continue through the week and end with a closing ceremony at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday.

The lamas on Tuesday prepared the site for the mandala with chants and music before they started to draw the line design for the mandala, intricate and exacting work that required the use of chalk lines, rulers and a large protractor and took hours to complete. Throughout the week, the monks will pour millions of grains of brightly colored sand into place using traditional metal funnels called chak-pur.

See a photo gallery from the opening ceremony below:







The monks will construct the mandala Wednesday through Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily, and on Saturday, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.The public is invited to observe the lamas while they create the mandala; admission to the exhibition is free.

The Year of Mindfulness is a series of events and a challenge to the campus community to live this year with mindfulness and intention. For more information, visit allegheny.edu/yearofmindfulness.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Here/Now Exhibitions

Allegheny College’s Art Department will present the Here/Now Exhibitions, exhibitions created by students and professors, during the week of March 6.

Various exhibitions and projects are scheduled throughout the week, with a final reception and celebration on Sunday, March 12, from noon to 1 p.m. The exhibits, showcased in the Bowman-Penelec-Meaghan Art Galleries in the Doane Hall of Art, are free and open to the public.

As part of the Allegheny’s ongoing Year of Mindfulness, the exhibitions will use creative processes as meditations on mindfulness, and offer a shared learning space for the collaborative projects. There will be a variety of project concepts, using various mediums. For more information, visit allegheny.edu/art and click on the “Exhibitions” link.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Art Galleries Present Here/Now

Allegheny College’s Art Department will present the Here/Now Exhibitions, exhibitions created by students and professors, during the week of March 6.

Various exhibitions and projects are scheduled throughout the week, with a final reception and celebration on Sunday, March 12, from noon to 1 p.m. The exhibits, showcased in the Bowman-Penelec-Meaghan Art Galleries in the Doane Hall of Art, are free and open to the public.

As part of the Allegheny’s ongoing Year of Mindfulness, the exhibitions will use creative processes as meditations on mindfulness, and offer a shared learning space for the collaborative projects. There will be a variety of project concepts, using various mediums.

·      Under the instruction of Instructor Heather Brand, photography students will create body contact prints in their classes Monday and Wednesday, 1:30 to 3:20 p.m. Visitors are invited to participate in the project as well.

·      Introduction to Studio Art students, instructed by Sculpture Technician Ian Thomas, will paint boxes white and strap them to their feet, and then walk across campus, accumulating dirt, marks, and other evidence of their journey. The boxes will then be put on display in the gallery.

Some of the exhibitions will be a direct response to the previous week’s exhibition, the creation of a sand mandala by Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery. The mandala demonstration will take place March 1-4 in the galleries, also as part of the Year of Mindfulness.

·      Professor Amara Geffen’s sculpture students will work to capture the sand mandala’s concepts in an installation of fluorescent lights. They will work with articulating geometric forms and rhythms, to explore sacred geometry and minimalism.

·      Students in a Freshman Seminar, directed by Associate Professor Darren Lee Miller, will begin their projects during the time the Tibetan monks are working on the mandala, observing and then creating preliminary drawings and reflective written responses. During the Here/Now Exhibitions, the students will choose one of their preliminary concepts to fully develop, as well as writing three haiku poems based on their reflections. After this, the students will come together, each bringing one drawing paired with one poem, and bind a set of accordion books. The prints and at least one book will remain on display throughout the week.

·      Introductory Drawing and the Black Art Expression classes, under the direction of Assistant Professor Steve Prince, will work together to address the question of “who we are as a people, and who we wish to be as a people,” by creating a large charcoal drawing. It will have two perspectives – one an objective representation of America with all its good and problematic aspects, and the other a hopeful speculation of what might come of a communal handling of the issues.

The exhibition is supported in part by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

The Year of Mindfulness is a series of events and a challenge to the campus community to live this year with mindfulness and intention. For more information, visit www.allegheny.edu/yearofmindfulness.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Studio art major develops book cover illustration

Studio art major Elizabeth Person ’17 was recently invited to develop a book cover illustration that was published by Elysium Press in November 2016. Elizabeth’s book cover provides an illustration for Dragon’s Discovery, a young adult fantasy novel that is the second installment of Edward Branley’s Blood Bound series. Dragon’s Discovery revolves around three teens from New Orleans who order a novelty dragon’s egg online. When the egg hatches an actual dragon, the teens find themselves faced with the task of raising the fantastical creature on top of their lives as high school students. Both Dragon’s Discovery and its predecessor, Dragon’s Danger, are available for purchase through Amazon.com.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny Galleries Present ‘Persuasion’

huracan1

The art galleries of Allegheny College will exhibit “Persuasion,” a survey of government-sponsored efforts at persuasion in the 20th century through the use of graphic art. The exhibit will open with a reception in the galleries on Tuesday, Jan. 24 from 7 to 9 p.m. and will continue through Feb. 21.

All of the works included “Persuasion” were made to shape public opinion. Whether the pieces led individuals toward a singular, shared worldview in line with a government’s agenda or resulted instead in public rejection of an agenda, the propagandistic elements influenced opinion simply through their creation and presentation. The exhibit includes WWII posters from the college’s permanent collection, photographs from the Farm Security Administration, and serigraphs from Puerto Rico’s Division of Community Education.
The exhibit is curated by Darren Lee Miller, associate professor of photography and digital imaging; Richard Schindler, professor of art history; and Ken Pinnow, professor of history. It is made possible, in part, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant for Collaborative Undergraduate Research in the Humanities at Allegheny College. The exhibit is supported in part by Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts, the regional arts funding partnership of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency.
Both the reception and the exhibit are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday12:30-4 p.m.Saturday1:30-5 p.m.; and Sunday2-4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.The Art Galleries, which are wheelchair accessible, are located in Doane Hall of Art, east of North Main Street between College and John Streets in Meadville.

For more information, call (814) 332-4365 or visit http://sites.allegheny.edu/art/the-art-department/galleryexhibitions/.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research