News & Updates

Global Citizens Scholars “Engage” diverse communities, cultures

The Global Citizens Scholars program was featured in the Fall 2017 issue of Engaged, published by the Allegheny Office of Civic Engagement.  The program integrates study in civic engagement, global learning, and U.S. diversity with the aim of developing a globally mindful & committed citizenry sensitive to community & cultural contexts.  (Below is a link to the full issue — the GCS article begins on page two.)

Engaged Magazine Fall 2017

Allegheny Professor Shares His Fulbright Experience

Eric Pallant photographed his share of sheep, rustic stonewalls, and vintage waterwheels during the spring 2017 semester which he spent in the United Kingdom as part of the Fulbright educational exchange program. Pallant, the Christine Scott Nelson Professor of Environmental Sustainability and chair of the Department of Environmental Science at Allegheny College, also taught students about food, sustainability and green campus initiatives at Lancaster University. And he presented his lecture, “6000 Years of Bread,” at Gresham College in London.

This was Pallant’s second Fulbright experience. In 2001 he was awarded a Fulbright to teach and conduct research at Israel’s Arava Institute for Environmental Studies.

The professor and some bison-type creature.

Having returned to campus in July from his latest Fulbright foray, the bread-baking professor shared a few observations about his semester overseas:

Is there any difference between Lancaster University students and those at Allegheny, and what might that difference be?

Because classes in the U.K. limit the amount of work that a professor can assign to a single homework per term students in the U.K. are much less swamped by weekly assignments. They have more time to read and some of them actually do the reading. While they may be very good readers, they are not nearly as practiced as Allegheny students are at applying what they learn to the kinds of real problems they will face after graduation.

What is something revolutionary you learned about making bread?

I used to think that great bread required only four ingredients: flour, water, salt, and leavening. The most important ingredient, however, is time. Giving dough a long time and being patient while it rises allows for complex flavors to develop that cannot be reproduced in bread that is rushed. Compare a homemade loaf to anything from the store, and you’ll understand what I mean. Slow rises are just as important for yeasted loaves as for sourdoughs, but sourdoughs, because they rely upon wild, rather than high-powered, commercial yeasts are inherently slower. In many ways the discovery of time as a fifth ingredient is a metaphor. Baking bread, especially slow bread made from sourdough is the antithesis and in my opinion the antidote to the high-speed, busy days most of us refer to as work and life.

Images of sourdough through a scanning electron microscope.

You had your sourdough starters analyzed — what did you learn about them from the National Collection for Yeast Cultures?

Check out the photo that the NCYC’s scanning electron microscope took of my sourdough starters. When they ran DNA analysis on my different starters, we were a little surprised to discover that they were all dominated by the same species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same species, by the way, used to make beer. NCYC did not have the resources to analyze the DNA of the bacteria so different species of bacteria might be living in my starters depending upon their origins.

What are the three most significant takeaways from your second Fulbright experience?

• Having time away from one’s ordinary life and job is a gift everyone should have.
• After attending an International conference in Manchester, England last spring I reached the conclusion that Allegheny should be preparing students to assist in meeting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 2030. I’ll be pushing that idea this upcoming year.
• After two terms at the University of Lancaster I am more convinced than ever that Allegheny’s liberal arts education is unsurpassed.

Pallant with Allegheny students who were studying in Lancaster, UK.

Did you host a European reunion of Allegheny alumni bread bakers?

Not exactly. But we did have a couple of wonderful meet-ups with the four Allegheny students studying at Lancaster this past spring. Check out the photo. The five of us are already scheming a get together for homemade Sticky-Toffee-Pudding, our favorite British dessert.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny Professor Shares His Fulbright Experience

Eric Pallant photographed his share of sheep, rustic stonewalls, and vintage waterwheels during the spring 2017 semester which he spent in the United Kingdom as part of the Fulbright educational exchange program. Pallant, the Christine Scott Nelson Professor of Environmental Sustainability and chair of the Department of Environmental Science at Allegheny College, also taught students about food, sustainability and green campus initiatives at Lancaster University. And he presented his lecture, “6000 Years of Bread,” at Gresham College in London.

This was Pallant’s second Fulbright experience. In 2001 he was awarded a Fulbright to teach and conduct research at Israel’s Arava Institute for Environmental Studies.

 

The professor and some bison-type creature.

Having returned to campus in July from his latest Fulbright foray, the bread-baking professor shared a few observations about his semester overseas:

Is there any difference between Lancaster University students and those at Allegheny, and what might that difference be?

Because classes in the U.K. limit the amount of work that a professor can assign to a single homework per term students in the U.K. are much less swamped by weekly assignments. They have more time to read and some of them actually do the reading. While they may be very good readers, they are not nearly as practiced as Allegheny students are at applying what they learn to the kinds of real problems they will face after graduation.

What is something revolutionary you learned about making bread?

I used to think that great bread required only four ingredients: flour, water, salt, and leavening. The most important ingredient, however, is time. Giving dough a long time and being patient while it rises allows for complex flavors to develop that cannot be reproduced in bread that is rushed. Compare a homemade loaf to anything from the store, and you’ll understand what I mean. Slow rises are just as important for yeasted loaves as for sourdoughs, but sourdoughs, because they rely upon wild, rather than high-powered, commercial yeasts are inherently slower. In many ways the discovery of time as a fifth ingredient is a metaphor. Baking bread, especially slow bread made from sourdough is the antithesis and in my opinion the antidote to the high-speed, busy days most of us refer to as work and life.

Images of sourdough through a scanning electron microscope.

You had your sourdough starters analyzed — what did you learn about them from the National Collection for Yeast Cultures?

Check out the photo that the NCYC’s scanning electron microscope took of my sourdough starters. When they ran DNA analysis on my different starters, we were a little surprised to discover that they were all dominated by the same species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same species, by the way, used to make beer. NCYC did not have the resources to analyze the DNA of the bacteria so different species of bacteria might be living in my starters depending upon their origins.

What are the three most significant takeaways from your second Fulbright experience?

• Having time away from one’s ordinary life and job is a gift everyone should have.
• After attending an International conference in Manchester, England last spring I reached the conclusion that Allegheny should be preparing students to assist in meeting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 2030. I’ll be pushing that idea this upcoming year.
• After two terms at the University of Lancaster I am more convinced than ever that Allegheny’s liberal arts education is unsurpassed.

Pallant with Allegheny students who were studying in Lancaster, UK.

Did you host a European reunion of Allegheny alumni bread bakers?

Not exactly. But we did have a couple of wonderful meet-ups with the four Allegheny students studying at Lancaster this past spring. Check out the photo. The five of us are already scheming a get together for homemade Sticky-Toffee-Pudding, our favorite British dessert.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Mattiace Presents Paper on Indigenous Resistance

Professor of Political Science and International Studies Shannan Mattiace presented her paper (with co-authors Guillermo Trejo [Notre Dame] and Sandra Ley [CIDE, Mexico City]) “Indigenous Resistance to Criminal Governance in Mexico” via Skype at the Latin American Studies Association Meetings in Lima, Peru, April 28-May 1. She presented a version of this paper at the Faculty Lecture series on campus in March.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Wayne Merrick Scholarship in International Studies for Study Abroad

The Wayne Merrick Scholarship in International Studies is intended to assist promising Allegheny College students majoring in International Studies with study for a semester or year abroad.  

Applications should be made for study abroad in academic year 2017-18. 

Applications for the scholarship should be submitted to Prof. Laura Reeck by Monday, April 10, 2017 (applications may be sent to Professor Reeck through campus mail [Box 190] but students should ensure that all materials arrive by the deadline).  

Applications should include the following:

1) a narrative description of study abroad plans, curricular and co-curricular activities and how study abroad will foster these

2) a copy of the applicant’s college transcript (it need not be official) 

3) documentation of acceptance to a study-abroad program or description of concrete plans to study abroad

Two scholarships of $2000 will be awarded. Please note that the monies will not be awarded to the student in cash, but will be applied to the student’s financial aid package. Recipients will be selected by the International Studies Steering Committee.

Mattiace’s essays, guide published

Professor of Political Science and International Studies Shannan Mattiace is the continuing editor of the Mexican Politics section of the Library of Congress’s Handbook of Latin American Studies. Volume 71 has just been published, which includes her select and annotated guide to recent publications in Mexican politics and accompanying essay on trends in the field.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Photographer to Share Experience of Walking the Israel National Trail

Professional photographer Udi Goren will talk about his journey along the Israel National Trail in the Collaboratory of Allegheny College’s Pelletier Library Pelletier on Nov. 18 at 4 p.m. The talk is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

The talk is part of International Education Week (IEW), a national initiative by the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education that aims “to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide,” as part of an effort to “promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences.

The Israel National Trail stretches over 700 miles, from Israel’s Lebanese border to Eliat, a town on the Egyptian border. Goren embarked on the journey following a personal crisis resulting from the 2014 war in Gaza. It took him two-and-a-half months to complete, but “with every single step, I was falling more in love with this trail,” Goren says. His talk will share his experience of both physical and mental challenges that led him “from despair to a newly found hope.

Goren is a graduate of the Brooks Institute of Photography in California, and his works have been displayed in exhibitions as well as published by several media outlets, including the National Geographic Channel.

More information about International Education Week (IEW) can be found at https://eca.state.gov/programs-initiatives/international-education-week. More information about Udi Goren and the talk can be found at http://www.israeltrailtalk.com.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research