Leech Wins Mathematical Association of America Teaching Award

The Allegheny Mountain Section of The Mathematical Association of America has awarded its 2017 Section Teaching Award to Instructor of Mathematics Cheryl Leech `87. Each year the award is presented to an MAA member in the Section who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary success in teaching, who has an ability to foster curiosity and generate excitement about mathematics, and whose teaching influence extends beyond their own institution.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Leech Wins Mathematical Association of America Teaching Award

The Allegheny Mountain Section of The Mathematical Association of America has awarded its 2017 Section Teaching Award to Instructor of Mathematics Cheryl Leech `87. Each year the award is presented to an MAA member in the Section who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary success in teaching, who has an ability to foster curiosity and generate excitement about mathematics, and whose teaching influence extends beyond their own institution.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Students Compete in William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition

At he beginning of December 2016, Allison Ganger (’18), Keith Irvin (’19), Diptajyoti Mukherjee (19′), Jonathan Goodman (’19), Aubrey Collins (19′), and Christopher Miller (’19) took part in the 77th annual William Lowell Putnam Mathematical competition. The competition itself is a six hour long exam consisting for twelve exceedingly difficult questions covering a wide range of mathematical concepts. This past year the exam was taken by 4,164 of the top undergraduate mathematics students in the nation. The students from Allegheny College prepared for the exam during weekly practice sessions throughout the Fall 2016 semester overseen by Professor Craig Dodge (Mathematics).

Allison Ganger, Keith Irvin, and Dipta Mukherjee represented Allegheny College as the official team for the school. There combined scores were ranked against the other school teams in the nation. As a result of their hard work, Allegheny placed 112 out of 568 schools that competed.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Students Compete in William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition

At he beginning of December 2016, Allison Ganger (’18), Keith Irvin (’19), Diptajyoti Mukherjee (19′), Jonathan Goodman (’19), Aubrey Collins (19′), and Christopher Miller (’19) took part in the 77th annual William Lowell Putnam Mathematical competition. The competition itself is a six hour long exam consisting for twelve exceedingly difficult questions covering a wide range of mathematical concepts. This past year the exam was taken by 4,164 of the top undergraduate mathematics students in the nation. The students from Allegheny College prepared for the exam during weekly practice sessions throughout the Fall 2016 semester overseen by Professor Craig Dodge (Mathematics).

Allison Ganger, Keith Irvin, and Dipta Mukherjee represented Allegheny College as the official team for the school. There combined scores were ranked against the other school teams in the nation. As a result of their hard work, Allegheny placed 112 out of 568 schools that competed.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Students Compete in William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition

At he beginning of December 2016, Allison Ganger (’18), Keith Irvin (’19), Diptajyoti Mukherjee (19′), Jonathan Goodman (’19), Aubrey Collins (19′), and Christopher Miller (’19) took part in the 77th annual William Lowell Putnam Mathematical competition. The competition itself is a six hour long exam consisting for twelve exceedingly difficult questions covering a wide range of mathematical concepts. This past year the exam was taken by 4,164 of the top undergraduate mathematics students in the nation. The students from Allegheny College prepared for the exam during weekly practice sessions throughout the Fall 2016 semester overseen by Professor Craig Dodge (Mathematics).

Allison Ganger, Keith Irvin, and Dipta Mukherjee represented Allegheny College as the official team for the school. There combined scores were ranked against the other school teams in the nation. As a result of their hard work, Allegheny placed 112 out of 568 schools that competed.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Peter Brooksbank: “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?”

Peter Brooksbank, professor of mathematics at Bucknell University, will deliver his address titled “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?” on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4 p.m. in Quigley Hall’s Henderson Auditorium as part of the Spring 2017 Math Speaker Series at Allegheny College. The event is free and open to the public.

Brooksbank will discuss what is known as the “P ≠ NP Problem,” arguably the most important open problem in mathematics and computer science.

Since 1972, the Math Speaker Series has brought Allegheny students into contact with many nationally and internationally prominent mathematicians. Brooksbank holds a doctorate from Oregon University. His research interests include computational algebra, finite groups and combinatorics.

The address is sponsored by the William Beazell Memorial Fund.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Peter Brooksbank: “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?”

Professor, 366 Olin Science, Numbers 3, 6. and 9 are his favorites.

Peter Brooksbank, professor of mathematics at Bucknell University, will deliver his address titled “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?” on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4 p.m. in Quigley Hall’s Henderson Auditorium as part of the Spring 2017 Math Speaker Series at Allegheny College. The event is free and open to the public.

Brooksbank will discuss what is known as the “P ≠ NP Problem,” arguably the most important open problem in mathematics and computer science.

Since 1972, the Math Speaker Series has brought Allegheny students into contact with many nationally and internationally prominent mathematicians. Brooksbank holds a doctorate from Oregon University. His research interests include computational algebra, finite groups and combinatorics.

The address is sponsored by the William Beazell Memorial Fund.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Math Speaker Series to Feature Peter Brooksbank

Peter Brooksbank, professor of mathematics at Bucknell University, will deliver his address titled “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?” on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4 p.m. in Quigley Hall’s Henderson Auditorium as part of the Spring 2017 Math Speaker Series at Allegheny College. The event is free and open to the public.

Brooksbank will discuss what is known as the “P ≠ NP Problem,” arguably the most important open problem in mathematics and computer science.

Since 1972, the Math Speaker Series has brought Allegheny students into contact with many nationally and internationally prominent mathematicians. Brooksbank holds a doctorate from Oregon University. His research interests include computational algebra, finite groups and combinatorics.

The address is sponsored by the William Beazell Memorial Fund.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Math Speaker Series to Feature Peter Brooksbank

Professor, 366 Olin Science, Numbers 3, 6. and 9 are his favorites.

Peter Brooksbank, professor of mathematics at Bucknell University, will deliver his address titled “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?” on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4 p.m. in Quigley Hall’s Henderson Auditorium as part of the Spring 2017 Math Speaker Series at Allegheny College. The event is free and open to the public.

Brooksbank will discuss what is known as the “P ≠ NP Problem,” arguably the most important open problem in mathematics and computer science.

Since 1972, the Math Speaker Series has brought Allegheny students into contact with many nationally and internationally prominent mathematicians. Brooksbank holds a doctorate from Oregon University. His research interests include computational algebra, finite groups and combinatorics.

The address is sponsored by the William Beazell Memorial Fund.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Math Speaker Series to Feature Peter Brooksbank

Peter Brooksbank, professor of mathematics at Bucknell University, will deliver his address titled “What Do You Mean, It’s Hard?” on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4 p.m. in Quigley Hall’s Henderson Auditorium as part of the Spring 2017 Math Speaker Series at Allegheny College. The event is free and open to the public.

Brooksbank will discuss what is known as the “P ≠ NP Problem,” arguably the most important open problem in mathematics and computer science.

Since 1972, the Math Speaker Series has brought Allegheny students into contact with many nationally and internationally prominent mathematicians. Brooksbank holds a doctorate from Oregon University. His research interests include computational algebra, finite groups and combinatorics.

The address is sponsored by the William Beazell Memorial Fund.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research