News & Updates

Come One, Come All

Allegheny's food co-op group.

By Heather Grubbs and Nahla Bendefaa ’16

Everyone loves a home-cooked meal.

But when you’re away at college, enjoying grandma’s homemade lasagna is often a sacrifice one must make.

Or is it?

One student-organized group is aiming to change that. The Food Co-op began two years ago as part of Class of 2014 graduate Taylor Hinton’s senior comp titled “Activism through Food: Creating a Housing and Dining Cooperative at Allegheny College.” Hinton says she initially intended for the co-op to “address inequalities in access to cooking spaces, account for a range of dietary needs and food cultures, share cooking knowledge, and provide students with local, cheap, home-cooked food.”

Hinton’s comp then expanded upon her vision by seeking to:
• Create a sustainable organizing structure for the dining cooperative.
• Expand the population that the group was serving as a cooperative.
• Acquire a house that would both support the dining cooperative and provide a second space in which students can live and cook together.

Cara Brosius ’16 helps to cook one of the food co-op group's Friday night dinners.

Cara Brosius ’16 helps to cook one of the Food Co-op group’s Friday night dinners.

Current students Cara Brosius ’16, Stephanie Latour ’16, and Hawk Weisman ’16, who live in what is now known as the Co-op House on North Main Street, are carrying on Hinton’s vision by hosting Friday night homemade dinners on campus. The dinners seek to accomplish Hinton’s goals, as well as allow students to share family recipes and cultures and enjoy each other’s company.

“Whether you want to share an ethnic meal or your family’s apple pie, this is a welcome space to do that,” says Weisman, who is double-majoring in computer science and environmental studies. “Cooking and eating meals together was something I always did with my family, so this is a way to continue that.”

According to Weisman and Brosius, students sign up to participate in each week’s dinner. Two students are then assigned to the “head chef” role – meaning they are responsible for planning the meal – and two other students are assigned as sous chefs to assist with preparation.

For those students who prefer to stay out of the kitchen, they still can participate by serving as grocery shoppers, by volunteering to clean up, or by simply enjoying the food.

“Everyone here is very friendly, and there is definitely a sense of community since everyone helps out either cooking or cleaning,” says Catherine Schnur ’17. “Also, the food is always delicious!”

“Co-op is a great way to meet people you wouldn’t normally meet. It’s also a very welcoming environment,” adds Kara Van Balen ’17. “My first time here I felt like everyone was immediately my friend.”

Hawk Weisman ’16 and Cara Brosius ’16 work together in Carr Hall to prepare a homemade meal.

Hawk Weisman ’16 and Cara Brosius ’16 work together in Carr Hall to prepare a homemade meal.

The dinners are prepared and consumed in Carr Hall, with about 20 to 30 students attending. The group asks for a suggested donation of $2 to $3 to help cover shopping costs, or students can pay $20 up front for the entire semester.

“We represent a wide variety of majors and backgrounds on campus, which leads to a diverse menu,” Weisman says.

“We’ve had everything from lasagna to soup to Mexican food, and we really try to purchase fresh ingredients when possible, especially from the on-campus garden, the Carrden,” adds Brosius, an economics major and astronomy and mathematics minor. “We’ve also had other groups on campus like Edible Allegheny and the Green Living House volunteer to cook during certain weeks. We’d like to expand this concept by having other groups on campus participate, too.”

Just like Hinton’s original vision, the group stresses that its “come one, come all” approach applies to those with dietary restrictions, as well.

“We have a number of students who are vegetarians or vegans or those who eat gluten-free or have allergies, so we always make sure there are a lot of options,” Brosius says. “Personally, I like co-op because I have problems digesting certain foods, so I like knowing how each meal is prepared. Knowing that it’s homemade is comforting to me. Co-op is kind of like our home away from home.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Come One, Come All

By Heather Grubbs and Nahla Bendefaa ’16

Everyone loves a home-cooked meal.

But when you’re away at college, enjoying grandma’s homemade lasagna is often a sacrifice one must make.

Or is it?

One student-organized group is aiming to change that. The Food Co-op began two years ago as part of Class of 2014 graduate Taylor Hinton’s senior comp titled “Activism through Food: Creating a Housing and Dining Cooperative at Allegheny College.” Hinton says she initially intended for the co-op to “address inequalities in access to cooking spaces, account for a range of dietary needs and food cultures, share cooking knowledge, and provide students with local, cheap, home-cooked food.”

Hinton’s comp then expanded upon her vision by seeking to:
• Create a sustainable organizing structure for the dining cooperative.
• Expand the population that the group was serving as a cooperative.
• Acquire a house that would both support the dining cooperative and provide a second space in which students can live and cook together.

Cara Brosius ’16 helps to cook one of the food co-op group's Friday night dinners.
Cara Brosius ’16 helps to cook one of the Food Co-op group’s Friday night dinners.

Current students Cara Brosius ’16, Stephanie Latour ’16, and Hawk Weisman ’16, who live in what is now known as the Co-op House on North Main Street, are carrying on Hinton’s vision by hosting Friday night homemade dinners on campus. The dinners seek to accomplish Hinton’s goals, as well as allow students to share family recipes and cultures and enjoy each other’s company.

“Whether you want to share an ethnic meal or your family’s apple pie, this is a welcome space to do that,” says Weisman, who is double-majoring in computer science and environmental studies. “Cooking and eating meals together was something I always did with my family, so this is a way to continue that.”

According to Weisman and Brosius, students sign up to participate in each week’s dinner. Two students are then assigned to the “head chef” role – meaning they are responsible for planning the meal – and two other students are assigned as sous chefs to assist with preparation.

For those students who prefer to stay out of the kitchen, they still can participate by serving as grocery shoppers, by volunteering to clean up, or by simply enjoying the food.

“Everyone here is very friendly, and there is definitely a sense of community since everyone helps out either cooking or cleaning,” says Catherine Schnur ’17. “Also, the food is always delicious!”

“Co-op is a great way to meet people you wouldn’t normally meet. It’s also a very welcoming environment,” adds Kara Van Balen ’17. “My first time here I felt like everyone was immediately my friend.”

Hawk Weisman ’16 and Cara Brosius ’16 work together in Carr Hall to prepare a homemade meal.
Hawk Weisman ’16 and Cara Brosius ’16 work together in Carr Hall to prepare a homemade meal.

The dinners are prepared and consumed in Carr Hall, with about 20 to 30 students attending. The group asks for a suggested donation of $2 to $3 to help cover shopping costs, or students can pay $20 up front for the entire semester.

“We represent a wide variety of majors and backgrounds on campus, which leads to a diverse menu,” Weisman says.

“We’ve had everything from lasagna to soup to Mexican food, and we really try to purchase fresh ingredients when possible, especially from the on-campus garden, the Carrden,” adds Brosius, an economics major and astronomy and mathematics minor. “We’ve also had other groups on campus like Edible Allegheny and the Green Living House volunteer to cook during certain weeks. We’d like to expand this concept by having other groups on campus participate, too.”

Just like Hinton’s original vision, the group stresses that its “come one, come all” approach applies to those with dietary restrictions, as well.

“We have a number of students who are vegetarians or vegans or those who eat gluten-free or have allergies, so we always make sure there are a lot of options,” Brosius says. “Personally, I like co-op because I have problems digesting certain foods, so I like knowing how each meal is prepared. Knowing that it’s homemade is comforting to me. Co-op is kind of like our home away from home.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

American Colors Inc. Prefers Blue and Gold

AC Group Photo 1_web

By Kathleen Prosperi ’11

Jim Wible ’71, co-founder and president of American Colors in Sandusky, Ohio, has long believed in the potential of Alleghenians. Not only does he advocate for students as a College trustee, he believes the Allegheny graduate to be a quality investment for his company, having recruited and hired Gators since the company’s inception in 1975.

“I know that the skills it takes to handle the pressure of getting a degree from Allegheny apply to the business world as well,” says Wible. His company provides high-quality liquid pigment systems and other products to the coatings, composites, plastics and allied industries. It serves customers from two manufacturing facilities, one in Sandusky, and the other in Lebanon, Tenn.

Finding committed, long-term employees has produced challenges, and a need for change has blossomed into what appears to be the next revolutionary idea in corporate recruitment.

Jim Fitch, assistant director of career education at Allegheny, explains: “Jim (Wible) came to me and proposed hiring a group of graduating seniors as a team, interviewing and hiring them as one unit … a unit with a variety of majors, skills and talents.”

The hope is to promote future success and satisfaction at American Colors through pre-existing, forged relationships while nurturing a critical mass of Allegheny alumni who contribute as employees.

Invited to apply as a group, Tyler Hogya ’14 (Economics/Computer Science), Jordan Encarnacion ’14 (Chemistry/Economics), John O’Donnell ’14 (Economics/Communication Arts), RC Kunig ’14 (Biology/Economics/Psychology), and Elliott Hasenkopf ’14 (Chemistry/Economics/Biology) were one of four cohorts to express interest.

“Over the past four years, we have become great friends through living, working and playing together,” said Hasenkopf.

“Being able to come right out of college and enter the real world with four of your best friends seemed surreal. I was extremely surprised to hear of this opportunity, mainly because I’ve never heard of such a strategy before. It was new to all of us,” O’Donnell added.

The idea was new to everyone involved, including the hiring team, which was comprised of Wible, Matt Kosior, chief operating officer, and Kayla Beatty ’12.

“We saw huge, exceptional talent,” says Wible. “This group, the one we chose, was the most enthusiastic and seemed to have a cohesiveness that I liked.”

The benefits will be twofold—for the graduates and for American Colors.

“Over the last few years, after we hired students from Allegheny, we noticed they would say, ‘I came here [to Sandusky, Ohio] and didn’t know anyone. I’m having trouble getting involved in the community and finding it tough to meet people,’” says Wible.

Although other Allegheny graduates were pleased with American Colors, assimilation in other areas of their lives proved to hamper their overall happiness. That won’t be the case with this group. “These graduates will now get to go into the real world with an immediate support system. We hope this will provide them with a smooth transition into the workplace with a sense of belonging,” Wible says.

The students also see the benefits: “When entering the professional workplace, it is essential, not only that you have many positive relationships, but that you continue to build upon them while continually adding new ones. Our pre-established relationship will also allow us to feel comfortable more quickly in our working environment,” says Kunig.

“We see this as a potential for longevity for the company, as well,” Wible adds. “We are hoping that all five of the new hires will like and form a long relationship with American Colors.”

“I believe our team chemistry will translate into a professional environment seamlessly. Not only are we able to achieve goals together, but we also challenge each other. I think the ability to bring in five new workers who already work well together will serve American Colors well, especially in project-oriented tasks,” says Hasenkopf.

American Colors wiblepic_web

At this point, the future of group recruitment can only be imagined. After all, it is not the norm. The benefits can be seen as huge, though, for all parties involved.

“We’re hoping that it can become a model … that other employers who can do this will think, ‘What a great idea. …Why don’t we do this too?’” says Fitch. “If we had 20 employers who did that, we would have huge diversity in the types of job opportunities we are providing to students.”

President James H. Mullen, Jr. adds: “Jim is a great Alleghenian who has long been committed to affording opportunities to our students. In hiring this very talented group of our graduates from diverse disciplines, he is at once implementing a very innovative business approach and reinforcing the strength of Allegheny’s liberal arts curriculum.”

No matter what comes from this unique hiring strategy, the future is bright for American Colors’ new team. The team began its first day at American Colors. Each person had their own job description: Encarnacion, Kunig and Hasenkopf are project chemist trainees and Hogya and O’Donnell are operations trainees. However, it should be pointed out that they will have the opportunity to work on a project together as a team, to exhibit abilities learned at Allegheny.

As graduation day approached in May, Hasenkopf reflected, “As graduation is upon us, everyone has started to say goodbye to Allegheny and the friends they have made here, but we have this amazing opportunity which will allow us to see our closest friends every day. We are all very excited to hit the ground running and apply our Allegheny College educations to our endeavors with American Colors.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

American Colors Inc. Prefers Blue and Gold

By Kathleen Prosperi ’11

Jim Wible ’71, co-founder and president of American Colors in Sandusky, Ohio, has long believed in the potential of Alleghenians. Not only does he advocate for students as a College trustee, he believes the Allegheny graduate to be a quality investment for his company, having recruited and hired Gators since the company’s inception in 1975.

“I know that the skills it takes to handle the pressure of getting a degree from Allegheny apply to the business world as well,” says Wible. His company provides high-quality liquid pigment systems and other products to the coatings, composites, plastics and allied industries. It serves customers from two manufacturing facilities, one in Sandusky, and the other in Lebanon, Tenn.

Finding committed, long-term employees has produced challenges, and a need for change has blossomed into what appears to be the next revolutionary idea in corporate recruitment.

Jim Fitch, assistant director of career education at Allegheny, explains: “Jim (Wible) came to me and proposed hiring a group of graduating seniors as a team, interviewing and hiring them as one unit … a unit with a variety of majors, skills and talents.”

The hope is to promote future success and satisfaction at American Colors through pre-existing, forged relationships while nurturing a critical mass of Allegheny alumni who contribute as employees.

Invited to apply as a group, Tyler Hogya ’14 (Economics/Computer Science), Jordan Encarnacion ’14 (Chemistry/Economics), John O’Donnell ’14 (Economics/Communication Arts), RC Kunig ’14 (Biology/Economics/Psychology), and Elliott Hasenkopf ’14 (Chemistry/Economics/Biology) were one of four cohorts to express interest.

“Over the past four years, we have become great friends through living, working and playing together,” said Hasenkopf.

“Being able to come right out of college and enter the real world with four of your best friends seemed surreal. I was extremely surprised to hear of this opportunity, mainly because I’ve never heard of such a strategy before. It was new to all of us,” O’Donnell added.

The idea was new to everyone involved, including the hiring team, which was comprised of Wible, Matt Kosior, chief operating officer, and Kayla Beatty ’12.

“We saw huge, exceptional talent,” says Wible. “This group, the one we chose, was the most enthusiastic and seemed to have a cohesiveness that I liked.”

The benefits will be twofold—for the graduates and for American Colors.

“Over the last few years, after we hired students from Allegheny, we noticed they would say, ‘I came here [to Sandusky, Ohio] and didn’t know anyone. I’m having trouble getting involved in the community and finding it tough to meet people,’” says Wible.

Although other Allegheny graduates were pleased with American Colors, assimilation in other areas of their lives proved to hamper their overall happiness. That won’t be the case with this group. “These graduates will now get to go into the real world with an immediate support system. We hope this will provide them with a smooth transition into the workplace with a sense of belonging,” Wible says.

The students also see the benefits: “When entering the professional workplace, it is essential, not only that you have many positive relationships, but that you continue to build upon them while continually adding new ones. Our pre-established relationship will also allow us to feel comfortable more quickly in our working environment,” says Kunig.

“We see this as a potential for longevity for the company, as well,” Wible adds. “We are hoping that all five of the new hires will like and form a long relationship with American Colors.”

“I believe our team chemistry will translate into a professional environment seamlessly. Not only are we able to achieve goals together, but we also challenge each other. I think the ability to bring in five new workers who already work well together will serve American Colors well, especially in project-oriented tasks,” says Hasenkopf.

American Colors wiblepic_web

At this point, the future of group recruitment can only be imagined. After all, it is not the norm. The benefits can be seen as huge, though, for all parties involved.

“We’re hoping that it can become a model … that other employers who can do this will think, ‘What a great idea. …Why don’t we do this too?’” says Fitch. “If we had 20 employers who did that, we would have huge diversity in the types of job opportunities we are providing to students.”

President James H. Mullen, Jr. adds: “Jim is a great Alleghenian who has long been committed to affording opportunities to our students. In hiring this very talented group of our graduates from diverse disciplines, he is at once implementing a very innovative business approach and reinforcing the strength of Allegheny’s liberal arts curriculum.”

No matter what comes from this unique hiring strategy, the future is bright for American Colors’ new team. The team began its first day at American Colors. Each person had their own job description: Encarnacion, Kunig and Hasenkopf are project chemist trainees and Hogya and O’Donnell are operations trainees. However, it should be pointed out that they will have the opportunity to work on a project together as a team, to exhibit abilities learned at Allegheny.

As graduation day approached in May, Hasenkopf reflected, “As graduation is upon us, everyone has started to say goodbye to Allegheny and the friends they have made here, but we have this amazing opportunity which will allow us to see our closest friends every day. We are all very excited to hit the ground running and apply our Allegheny College educations to our endeavors with American Colors.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Soccer to Football

Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 8.17.08 AM

BY MARISSA ORBANEKErie Times-News

Ashley Lehr’s biggest soccer challenges not too long ago were against opponents like Depauw and Denison universities.

Now, her most challenging opponents are teams such as Madrid Club de Futbol Femenino B, Club deportivo Avance and Camarma Club de Futbol.

The 2013 Allegheny College graduate has been in Europe since October working as assistant director of international students at EduKick Madrid Football & Education Academy and playing women’s soccer, or futbol, competitively with A.D. Colmenar Viejo just outside the Spanish capital.

“It’s extremely difficult, especially with where she was going, for an American woman to play soccer internationally overseas. For her to get this opportunity is a huge accomplishment,” said Allegheny College head coach Michael Webber, who was Lehr’s coach. “She figured out what she needed to do, and she worked for it.”

The EduKick Madrid Female Football Academy is a yearlong course for competitive female soccer players between the ages of 13 and 18 who want to continue their academic studies in Madrid while also attending a professional soccer academy.

During the day, Lehr’s duties as assistant director include helping participants with their academics, including organization, goal setting, and general understanding of the material. She also acts as a full-time adult monitor for the participants, residing among the players in a private dorm room in the same hallway — similar to a college dorm room, Lehr said.

In addition, Lehr said she also translates player reviews and other football materials from Spanish to English and updates EduKick Madrid social media sites.

Lehr came across the opportunity while searching for “soccer boarding schools in Madrid.” Having graduated from Allegheny College with a dual BA in managerial economics and Spanish, Lehr was looking for an opportunity to combine all of her passions — soccer, Spanish culture and working with young people.

When she saw the opportunity to play in the Madrid area, while helping students in their studies and goal setting, Lehr knew this opportunity was for her — and she hasn’t looked back.

“Working with EduKick Madrid this year has been an inspiring challenge, which has already taught me many new skills,” Lehr said. “Since the student-athletes who attend EduKick Madrid come from very different cultural backgrounds, it is an adjustment for all of them to be surrounded by new people and to be in a new environment. Fortunately, the main reason we are all here is for football, and football is powerful in itself; it unites us and reminds us that we are all here for the same reasons — to play, to improve and to enjoy the game.”

Lehr, the daughter of Lance and Andrea (Scott) Lehr, graduated from Fairview High School in 2009. During her time at Allegheny College, Lehr was a two-time Alden Scholar and a four-year varsity soccer player. As a senior, she was named team captain and received the 1st Team All-Conference Award. In 2011, Lehr received All-Conference honorable mention as North Coast Athletic Conference co-champions, and in 2010 her squad made the first round of the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament.

“She has a great passion for life, and that helps with any situation,” Webber said. “She loves to play, she loves the game, and she loves building relationships and connecting with other people. That all contributes to her successes both at Allegheny and overseas.”

While she works during the day, Lehr gets to pursue her passion of soccer during evening trainings with the soccer team. The soccer season runs from September to June with games every weekend.

“Playing soccer on a Spanish team has been nothing short of amazing,” she said. “Every time I have soccer practice, it’s like I also have a Spanish lesson. It has been a fantastic way to immerse myself and learn the language like a native.”

But according to Lehr, the name itself isn’t the only thing that differs from the United States’ game. Lehr said that the mindset in general is completely different.

“With regard to soccer, the game is very different. In the U.S., the style of play is very aggressive and very direct, and here in Spain the style is more geared toward maintaining the ball and having individual ball skills,” Lehr said.

Lehr also gets to learn about other cultures all over the world, as well. She said the students within the program are very diverse. This year, they have had students from Algeria, Russia, India, Canada, France, Australia, Libya, Mexico and Romania.

Lehr said she will stay with the EduKick Madrid program through the 2014-2015 academic year. During her stay, she will also study to earn a master’s degree in sports business management.

Lehr’s advice for young women and female athletes: “Find what your passions are, and then figure out a way to apply them to your career and daily life,” she said. “Playing sports teaches you so much, such as discipline, motivation, time management, dedication and responsibility, and if you can continue on with your sport and or work in that department, take advantage of it.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Soccer to Football

BY MARISSA ORBANEKErie Times-News

Ashley Lehr’s biggest soccer challenges not too long ago were against opponents like Depauw and Denison universities.

Now, her most challenging opponents are teams such as Madrid Club de Futbol Femenino B, Club deportivo Avance and Camarma Club de Futbol.

The 2013 Allegheny College graduate has been in Europe since October working as assistant director of international students at EduKick Madrid Football & Education Academy and playing women’s soccer, or futbol, competitively with A.D. Colmenar Viejo just outside the Spanish capital.

“It’s extremely difficult, especially with where she was going, for an American woman to play soccer internationally overseas. For her to get this opportunity is a huge accomplishment,” said Allegheny College head coach Michael Webber, who was Lehr’s coach. “She figured out what she needed to do, and she worked for it.”

The EduKick Madrid Female Football Academy is a yearlong course for competitive female soccer players between the ages of 13 and 18 who want to continue their academic studies in Madrid while also attending a professional soccer academy.

During the day, Lehr’s duties as assistant director include helping participants with their academics, including organization, goal setting, and general understanding of the material. She also acts as a full-time adult monitor for the participants, residing among the players in a private dorm room in the same hallway — similar to a college dorm room, Lehr said.

In addition, Lehr said she also translates player reviews and other football materials from Spanish to English and updates EduKick Madrid social media sites.

Lehr came across the opportunity while searching for “soccer boarding schools in Madrid.” Having graduated from Allegheny College with a dual BA in managerial economics and Spanish, Lehr was looking for an opportunity to combine all of her passions — soccer, Spanish culture and working with young people.

When she saw the opportunity to play in the Madrid area, while helping students in their studies and goal setting, Lehr knew this opportunity was for her — and she hasn’t looked back.

“Working with EduKick Madrid this year has been an inspiring challenge, which has already taught me many new skills,” Lehr said. “Since the student-athletes who attend EduKick Madrid come from very different cultural backgrounds, it is an adjustment for all of them to be surrounded by new people and to be in a new environment. Fortunately, the main reason we are all here is for football, and football is powerful in itself; it unites us and reminds us that we are all here for the same reasons — to play, to improve and to enjoy the game.”

Lehr, the daughter of Lance and Andrea (Scott) Lehr, graduated from Fairview High School in 2009. During her time at Allegheny College, Lehr was a two-time Alden Scholar and a four-year varsity soccer player. As a senior, she was named team captain and received the 1st Team All-Conference Award. In 2011, Lehr received All-Conference honorable mention as North Coast Athletic Conference co-champions, and in 2010 her squad made the first round of the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament.

“She has a great passion for life, and that helps with any situation,” Webber said. “She loves to play, she loves the game, and she loves building relationships and connecting with other people. That all contributes to her successes both at Allegheny and overseas.”

While she works during the day, Lehr gets to pursue her passion of soccer during evening trainings with the soccer team. The soccer season runs from September to June with games every weekend.

“Playing soccer on a Spanish team has been nothing short of amazing,” she said. “Every time I have soccer practice, it’s like I also have a Spanish lesson. It has been a fantastic way to immerse myself and learn the language like a native.”

But according to Lehr, the name itself isn’t the only thing that differs from the United States’ game. Lehr said that the mindset in general is completely different.

“With regard to soccer, the game is very different. In the U.S., the style of play is very aggressive and very direct, and here in Spain the style is more geared toward maintaining the ball and having individual ball skills,” Lehr said.

Lehr also gets to learn about other cultures all over the world, as well. She said the students within the program are very diverse. This year, they have had students from Algeria, Russia, India, Canada, France, Australia, Libya, Mexico and Romania.

Lehr said she will stay with the EduKick Madrid program through the 2014-2015 academic year. During her stay, she will also study to earn a master’s degree in sports business management.

Lehr’s advice for young women and female athletes: “Find what your passions are, and then figure out a way to apply them to your career and daily life,” she said. “Playing sports teaches you so much, such as discipline, motivation, time management, dedication and responsibility, and if you can continue on with your sport and or work in that department, take advantage of it.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Seventeen Allegheny Students Participate in Sigma Xi Undergraduate Research and Creative Accomplishment Conference

Seventeen Allegheny students participated in the Sigma Xi Undergraduate Research and Creative Accomplishment Conference held at Penn State Behrend on April 12. They are (with their faculty advisors listed in parentheses): Leanne Balster ’14 (Stephanie Martin and Ben Slote), Patricia Belle ’14 (Brad Hersh), Mark Burkhart ’14 (Scott Wissinger), Jordan Gaston ’16 (Tricia Humphreys), Shelby Hernan ’15 (Jeff Cross), Maria Miranda ’14 (Jeff Cross), Allison Palmer ’14 (Tricia Humphreys), Patrick Payne ’15 (Stephanie Martin), Kirsten Ressel ’14 (Scott Wissinger and Matt Venesky), Tashina Robinson ’14 (Tricia Humphreys), Kelsey Sadlek ’14 (Brad Hersh), Samantha Skobel ’16 (Jeff Cross), Amanda Spadaro ’15 (Kristen Webb), Rachel Stegemann ’14 (Brad Hersh), Adrianna Stolarski ’14 (Milt Ostrofsky), Rachel Verno ’14 (Stephanie Martin), and Jennie Vorhauer ’14 (Brad Hersh). Gaston, Hernan, Ressel, Stegemann, and Stolarski were given awards for best presentations in their sessions. A total of 248 students and 136 faculty from 13 colleges in western and central Pennsylvania participated in the conference.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Seventeen Allegheny Students Participate in Sigma Xi Undergraduate Research and Creative Accomplishment Conference

Seventeen Allegheny students participated in the Sigma Xi Undergraduate Research and Creative Accomplishment Conference held at Penn State Behrend on April 12. They are (with their faculty advisors listed in parentheses): Leanne Balster ’14 (Stephanie Martin and Ben Slote), Patricia Belle ’14 (Brad Hersh), Mark Burkhart ’14 (Scott Wissinger), Jordan Gaston ’16 (Tricia Humphreys), Shelby Hernan ’15 (Jeff Cross), Maria Miranda ’14 (Jeff Cross), Allison Palmer ’14 (Tricia Humphreys), Patrick Payne ’15 (Stephanie Martin), Kirsten Ressel ’14 (Scott Wissinger and Matt Venesky), Tashina Robinson ’14 (Tricia Humphreys), Kelsey Sadlek ’14 (Brad Hersh), Samantha Skobel ’16 (Jeff Cross), Amanda Spadaro ’15 (Kristen Webb), Rachel Stegemann ’14 (Brad Hersh), Adrianna Stolarski ’14 (Milt Ostrofsky), Rachel Verno ’14 (Stephanie Martin), and Jennie Vorhauer ’14 (Brad Hersh). Gaston, Hernan, Ressel, Stegemann, and Stolarski were given awards for best presentations in their sessions. A total of 248 students and 136 faculty from 13 colleges in western and central Pennsylvania participated in the conference.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Five at Allegheny Complete Intensive Course in Career Coaching

Jim Fitch, Kristin Mook, and Michaeline Shuman of Career Education/The Gateway, Associate Provost Terry Bensel, and Assistant Professor of Economics Russ Ormiston completed the NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) career coaching intensive two-day course in Charlotte, North Carolina in January. Instructor Kate Brooks, of Wake Forest University, taught participants effective coaching techniques to use with groups as well as individuals and how to select and apply the technique best suited for an individual, as well as provided insight into the latest trends and tactics in career coaching.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Five at Allegheny Complete Intensive Course in Career Coaching

Jim Fitch, Kristin Mook, and Michaeline Shuman of Career Education/The Gateway, Associate Provost Terry Bensel, and Assistant Professor of Economics Russ Ormiston completed the NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) career coaching intensive two-day course in Charlotte, North Carolina in January. Instructor Kate Brooks, of Wake Forest University, taught participants effective coaching techniques to use with groups as well as individuals and how to select and apply the technique best suited for an individual, as well as provided insight into the latest trends and tactics in career coaching.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research