Students Lobby Pennsylvania Legislators to Preserve Financial Aid

Allegheny students Carlos Sanchez (left) and Jesse Tomkiwiecz (right) with Pennsylvania State Senator Michele Brooks on Student Aid Advocacy Day.

Allegheny College students Carlos Sanchez and Jesse Tomkiewicz joined scores of college students from across Pennsylvania for Student Aid Advocacy Day, sponsored by the Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Pennsylvania (AICUP) in Harrisburg in April.

The annual event gives students from AICUP-member institutions a chance to meet legislators and encourage them to support private colleges and universities. Allegheny has been sending student representatives for at least the past six years, and Sanchez and Tomkiewicz have participated for two consecutive years. Sanchez is an economics major from Allentown, Pennsylvania, and Tomkiewicz is a philosophy and political science major from Freeport, Pennsylvania.

This year’s Student Aid Advocacy Day focused primarily on opposing a proposed $705 reduction to the maximum grant from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). On May 24, the agency’s board agreed to increase its contribution to the Student Grant Program in 2018–19 from its originally proposed $50 million to $100 million. The decision eliminated the need for any cuts in grant awards for the 2018–19 school year.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Congratulations Emma Dimattio ’18!

Emma DiMatteo2018 graduate Emma Dimattio is the new Talent Acquisition Assistant at UPMC – congratulations! #gatorsintheworkforce

 

Recent Allegheny Graduate John Hughes Named Academic All-America

Recent Allegheny College graduate John Hughes has been named to the 2017–18 Google Cloud/CoSIDA Academic All-America Team.

Hughes becomes the 37th student-athlete in Allegheny College history to earn the prestigious Academic All-America laurel, and the sixth Gator men’s track and field/cross country student-athlete to do so.

A mathematics major and economics minor, Hughes graduated in May with a 3.90 cumulative grade-point average, and was previously recognized as Allegheny’s William Crawford Academic Achievement Award winner, the Allegheny North Coast Athletic Conference Scholar-Athlete Award winner, and as the 2017–18 Allegheny Senior Athlete Achievement Award recipient.

Read the full story on the Allegheny Gators Athletics website.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Coin Capital Team Wins Zingale Big Idea Competition at Allegheny College

Allegheny College students James Burnette, Austin Bristol and Joe Nagel won first prize and $5,000 in Allegheny’s Annual Zingale Big Idea Competition, a contest sponsored by the college’s Center for Business and Economics and modeled after ABC’s popular “Shark Tank” show.

Big Idea Competition 2018 Winner
From left: Chris Allison, Austin Bristol, James Burnette and Lance Zingale

Burnette, Bristol and Nagel’s team — Coin Capital — pitched an idea for a hedge fund that specializes in high frequency trading between the U.S. dollar and cryptocurrencies. They have worked together since December on developing a proprietary algorithm to trade and generate a profit in these markets.

In all, 25 teams of students — 20 from Allegheny and five from Grove City College — entered the competition, held April 27–28. The winning teams included students with academic majors that run the gamut from art to computer science to economics to environmental science.

“The success of a liberal arts education was on full display at this year’s Zingale Big Idea Competition,” said Chris Allison, Allegheny entrepreneur in residence and co-coordinator of the competition. “Students presented innovative ideas that reflected the breadth and depth of what they are learning and the analytical skills they are developing. We are very excited to see what they do next.”

Other award winners were:

Second Prize ($2,500)
MunchYum — Frank Chen and Chris Miller (Allegheny College)

Third Prize ($1,500)
KnowIT — Jeremy Moore, Eduardo Anaya and Kadeem Lafargue (Allegheny College)

The Next Big Idea ($1,000) – the proposal showing the most potential for further development
Aid Memoir — Natalia Buczek (Allegheny College)

Honorable Mentions
SEO Vineyard  —  Connor Grieb (Grove City College)
Chute — Steve Weaver, Levi Roberts and Boyce Cubarney (Grove City College)

The competition was renamed last year in honor of 1977 Allegheny graduate Lance Zingale and his wife, Karen. In November, the Zingales made a gift to establish a $500,000 endowed fund supporting the Center for Business and Economics. Lance Zingale has served as a judge at the competition for the last four years and is a member of the center’s Board of Visitors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

In Case You Missed It…the 17th Annual Executive Roundtable

This year’s Roundtable, “The Opioid Crisis, Business, and the Economy” was a purposeful discussion of the crisis that has touched every area of the United States. Our 2018 Distinguished Panel included Dionissi Aliprantis, Ph.D., Senior Research Economist, Federal Reserve of Cleveland, Denise Johnson MD, Chief Medical Officer, Meadville Medical Center, The Honorable Mike Kelly, U.S. Representative, Pennsylvania 3rd District and Elisabeth Smith, President and CEO, Acutec Precision Aerospace. Visit our web page to view the video of this timely event.

Allegheny College to Host Annual Zingale Big Idea Competition

The Center for Business and Economics at Allegheny College will hold its 11th Annual Zingale Big Idea Competition April 27–28 in Quigley Hall on the Allegheny campus. The contest emulates the experiences seen on the popular CNBC broadcast “Shark Tank.” The public is invited to attend the final round of presentations on Saturday, April 28, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Students will present entrepreneurial concepts with the chance to receive funding through cash prizes. The ideas must fit into one of four areas: For-profit Business, Not-for-profit Social Venture, Research Project, or Community Engagement Initiative. Students work in teams and design 20-minute presentations for their ideas, which they present at the competition.

The first-place team will receive a $5,000 cash prize. In total, $10,000 in prizes and trophies will be awarded, with the first-, second- and third-place teams receiving trophies, monetary prizes and honorable mentions.

Some students have re-purposed their Junior Seminar or Senior Comp projects, or have taken the Economics of Entrepreneurship II class, to prepare for this competition. This year, there are 25 teams of one to three students each. Five of the teams are from Grove City College; the remaining 20 consist of Allegheny students.

The competition was renamed last year in honor of 1977 Allegheny graduate Lance Zingale and his wife, Karen. In November, the Zingales made a gift to establish a $500,000 endowed fund supporting the Center for Business and Economics. Lance Zingale has served as a judge at the competition for the last four years and is a member of the center’s Board of Visitors.

This year’s competition will be judged by a panel of two Allegheny faculty and 12 accomplished professionals, 11 of whom are Allegheny alumni. Among those are Zingale and 2017 Allegheny graduate Liana Leja, the first-place award winner in last year’s competition. Her “Care Van” proposal improved access to medical care in the Meadville community while reducing costs and improving operational efficiencies.

Entrepreneur in Residence Chris Allison and Sarah Holt are co-coordinators of the Big Idea competition. Allison says that the competition challenges students to step outside their comfort zones and develop creative solutions that address a need.

“Students participating in the competition are expected to do their homework,” Allison says. “They thoroughly research the marketplace, find a niche where they can make a difference, polish their presentation and make the pitch to executives. It’s a demanding but rewarding experience for them, and we are excited to hear this year’s big ideas.”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Senior Samantha Bretz Sets Her Sights on Becoming Miss Pennsylvania

Allegheny College senior Samantha Bretz will compete for the title of Miss Pennsylvania in June, now that she already carries the banner of Miss Crawford County.

Allegheny senior Samantha Bretz from Adrian, Michigan, won the title of Miss Crawford County. Photo Credit: Julie Haemer-Scott/Cambridge Springs

Bretz was crowned Miss Crawford County 2018 in February, competing against eight other contestants in Conneaut Lake. She won the interview, talent and evening gown awards as well as the first-place scholarship. Bretz performed a ballet routine to the Cupid Variation “Act III: Amour” from Don Quixote, a routine known for requiring impeccable balance and lightness.

“In the interview room, the judges asked me ‘Why are you here today?,’ Bretz recalls from her February pageant competition. “I replied ‘Crawford County is the reason.’ Out of all the places in the world I’ve traveled to, this is the place where I discovered a passion for experiential education. Now I’ve made it my mission to bring creativity, collaboration, and reflection to classrooms across my communities. I work toward a future where students can develop a sense of purpose in their education and can learn by play rather than by rote.

“For me, it’s all about personal development,” says Bretz, who is from Adrian, Michigan. “Each category of the competition challenges you to express your best self, and that comes from the preparation and practice. Titleholders should be able to eloquently communicate their thoughts and ideas, exude passion for their platforms, exhibit poise and confidence, think on their feet in stressful situations, and work toward presenting their talent beautifully.

“Once crowned, a titleholder has a “year of service” promoting her personal platform by advocating and leading in her community. I started competing as a creative means to fund my education. The Miss America Organization is the leading scholarship provider for women in the U.S., and I have been fortunate to receive multiple scholarships toward my Allegheny education.”

On campus, Bretz is an economics major and minoring in both French and dance and movement studies. She has been involved for her four years with the Orchesis Dance Company, serving as both choreographer and president, and has been a member of Delta Delta Delta, the Jazz and Dance Ensemble (JaDE), the Allegheny College choirs, Lambda Sigma sophomore honor society, the Finance and Facilities Committee, and Omicron Delta Epsilon. She volunteers with Civic Engagement, is employed as a Center for Business and Economics fellow, and interns for the Gifted/Talented middle school enrichment program.

Last year, Bretz competed in a pageant in Michigan and won the title of Miss River Raisin Festival. For Bretz, pageants have helped her to become the best version of herself — able to speak confidently, keep well-informed, and further her passion for progressive education methods.

“I would not be the successful individual I am today without the Miss America Organization,” says Bretz. “For my very first pageant interview, I was shaking in my heels as the judges asked controversial questions about current topics. By staying informed and engaging in civil discourse with my peers, I became so much more self-assured in expressing myself, and now I can confidently give an opinion on any topic in front of any audience.”

Bretz has accepted a position with Boston Scientific as a finance leadership development program associate immediately following her graduation in May. Her experience at Allegheny, as well as the rigorous practice of interviewing through the Miss America Organization, has helped her to become an ideal candidate for the position, she says.

“Even after I stop competing, I will always have this passion for education and will continue to seek ways to change the world,” she says. “It’s not just a crown in a beauty contest, but a platform to create meaningful change, and that’s what I love about Miss America. … Who knows what new and exciting opportunities await? Next stop, Miss Pennsylvania!”

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny to Host Panel of Experts Discussing the Economic Impact of the Opioid Crisis

The opioid crisis has hit Pennsylvania hard.

Fatal overdoses rose 37 percent across the state between 2015 and 2016 and are now the leading cause of death among Americans under 50, health statistics from Pennsylvania and other states show. Death rates have been particularly high in counties in Western Pennsylvania. Beaver, Allegheny, Washington, Butler, Crawford and Erie counties had death rates in 2016 that placed them in the top one-third of counties in the state.

The increased use of heroin and other opioids raises questions about how this crisis is affecting business and the economy.

Allegheny College’s 17th Executive Roundtable at 4 p.m. Monday, April 9, in Ford Memorial Chapel, will examine “The Opioid Crisis, Business and the Economy” and will bring together executives and government and health professionals to discuss the implications of the crisis on American society. The event is hosted by the college’s Center for Business and Economics and Law & Policy Program. It is free and open to the public.

The panel of experts will include: Dionissi Aliprantis, senior research economist at the Federal Reserve of Cleveland; Denise Johnson, chief medical officer at the Meadville Medical Center; Republican Congressman Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania’s 3rd District, and Elisabeth Smith, president and chief executive officer of Acutec Precision Aerospace. Zachary Callen, Allegheny professor of political science, will serve as panel moderator.

The roundtable’s expert panelists from the world of economics, medicine and politics will discuss the implications of the opioid crisis and the economic challenges that confront all facets of society from families to businesses to health-care teams.

“In November 2017 the Council of Economic Advisors published a study that estimated the cost of the opioid crisis in 2015 alone was $500 billion nationwide,” said Tomas Nonnenmacher, professor of economics and co-director of Allegheny’s Center for Business and Economics. “This is a staggering loss, mostly due to over 33,000 opioid-involved deaths of mostly working-age individuals. In the roundtable discussion, we will hear from an economist, a health professional, an employer and a member of Congress who are studying how the opioid crisis affects individuals, business and the economy and how policies and partnerships might help individuals, businesses and health-care professionals to best respond.”

The Executive Roundtable is supported by the Earl W. Adams Jr. Endowment, established by Allegheny College Trustee William H. Brown Jr., Allegheny class of 1980, in honor of Professor Earl William Adams Jr. — teacher, mentor and friend. For more information on the roundtable, contact cbe@allegheny.edu.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Introduces New Major in Business

Allegheny College will introduce a new major in business that integrates classroom learning with experiential opportunities available through the college’s Center for Business and Economics. The program will be offered beginning with the 2018–19 academic year by the Department of Economics, which has provided a business/managerial track within its economics major for 18 years.

“Our increasingly complex and connected world demands business leaders who excel as professionals and understand their responsibility to solve problems affecting society at large,” Allegheny President James H. Mullen, Jr., said. “Our new major in business builds on our existing strength in business education and is designed to provide students with the foundation to advance in their careers, instill in them the ability to adapt in a constantly evolving marketplace, and inspire their commitment to contribute as local and global citizens.”

The business major incorporates core coursework in economics, accounting, management, statistics, ethics and communications. Students also can take courses in important areas such as entrepreneurship, finance, human resource management, marketing, international business and organizational behavior.

Through the college’s Center for Business and Economics, business majors at Allegheny can capitalize on internships, research, study abroad programs and other experiential-learning activities. For example, the center coordinates trips to New York City and other major cities for students to visit leading corporations, invites seasoned executives to campus to interact with students, and sponsors the annual Zingale Big Idea Competition, which awards $10,000 in prizes to students seeking funding for their business concepts.

“Along with equipping students with fundamental quantitative skills and advanced knowledge, we are focused on educating the next generation of business leaders to think critically, communicate clearly, consider problems from multiple perspectives and step forward to develop innovative solutions,” Stephen Onyeiwu, professor and chair in the Department of Economics, said. “The business major also will challenge students to put their classroom learning into practice through our Center for Business and Economics, which brings together a wide range of meaningful opportunities for students to interact with industry leaders, gain career experience and think more expansively about their future.”

Like all academic majors at Allegheny, the business major will require students to complete a Senior Comprehensive Project, an original piece of scholarly or creative work similar to a master’s thesis. All Allegheny students also declare a minor or a second major from an academic division outside of their major. This curriculum is designed to help students develop big-picture thinking and problem-solving skills.

“We want to do more than simply prepare students majoring in business to succeed in their first job,” Onyeiwu said. “That initial step in their career is certainly important, but beyond that we want to empower our graduates to pivot as businesses change and the needs of society grow.”

Learn more about Allegheny’s new major in business here.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Introduces New Major in Business

Business Major

Allegheny College will introduce a new major in business that integrates classroom learning with experiential opportunities available through the college’s Center for Business and Economics. The program will be offered beginning with the 2018–19 academic year by the Department of Economics, which has provided a business/managerial track within its economics major for 18 years.

“Our increasingly complex and connected world demands business leaders who excel as professionals and understand their responsibility to solve problems affecting society at large,” Allegheny President James H. Mullen, Jr., said. “Our new major in business builds on our existing strength in business education and is designed to provide students with the foundation to advance in their careers, instill in them the ability to adapt in a constantly evolving marketplace, and inspire their commitment to contribute as local and global citizens.”

The business major incorporates core coursework in economics, accounting, management, statistics, ethics and communications. Students also can take courses in important areas such as entrepreneurship, finance, human resource management, marketing, international business and organizational behavior.

Through the college’s Center for Business and Economics, business majors at Allegheny can capitalize on internships, research, study abroad programs and other experiential-learning activities. For example, the center coordinates trips to New York City and other major cities for students to visit leading corporations, invites seasoned executives to campus to interact with students, and sponsors the annual Zingale Big Idea Competition, which awards $10,000 in prizes to students seeking funding for their business concepts.

“Along with equipping students with fundamental quantitative skills and advanced knowledge, we are focused on educating the next generation of business leaders to think critically, communicate clearly, consider problems from multiple perspectives and step forward to develop innovative solutions,” Stephen Onyeiwu, professor and chair in the Department of Economics, said. “The business major also will challenge students to put their classroom learning into practice through our Center for Business and Economics, which brings together a wide range of meaningful opportunities for students to interact with industry leaders, gain career experience and think more expansively about their future.”

Like all academic majors at Allegheny, the business major will require students to complete a Senior Comprehensive Project, an original piece of scholarly or creative work similar to a master’s thesis. All Allegheny students also declare a minor or a second major from an academic division outside of their major. This curriculum is designed to help students develop big-picture thinking and problem-solving skills.

“We want to do more than simply prepare students majoring in business to succeed in their first job,” Onyeiwu said. “That initial step in their career is certainly important, but beyond that we want to empower our graduates to pivot as businesses change and the needs of society grow.”

Learn more about Allegheny’s new major in business here.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research