Bulletin Updates

Sixteen Gators Earn Bloomberg Certification

Quigley Hall
Quigley Hall is the home to the Bloomberg Lab at Allegheny College

During the fall 2020 semester, sixteen Allegheny College students distinguished themselves by completing BMC Certification in the Bloomberg Lab located in Quigley Hall. By taking the Introduction to Bloomberg Terminals Course, students received an introduction to financial markets, benefiting from faculty guidance and instruction throughout the process. With on-campus course integration, students learned how to use important analytical functions in the terminal, conduct economic research and analysis, and benefit from a wide-range of pre-built analytical models.

Adapting to the “new normal’ while earning certification

According to Assistant Professor Tim Bianco, “The students thrived taking the Bloomberg course during the pandemic, even those attending remotely. Those taking the course in person were able to get the desirable hands-on training in Bloomberg as usual. Even those taking the class remotely thrived. We adapted by using more case studies and discussing current topics regarding the markets and Covid-19. The remote students are eager to get back to campus soon, and when they do, they will already have a new set of skills using Bloomberg.”

Bloomberg certification is a globally recognized credential, giving students a competitive edge when looking for post-graduate opportunities in banking and finance. The Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is a course that provides an interactive introduction to the financial markets. BMC consists of 3 sections — Core Concepts (includes four modules – Economic Indicators, Currencies, Fixed Income, Equities), Getting Started on the Terminal and Portfolio Management. 

Students who completed certification in the fall include:

Ariana Clark Chukuwuebuka Oradubanya  Conner Mastalerz
Kaylin Tang
Harley O’Brochta
Marcus Wolf
Morgan Douglas
Nolan Thompson
Noah Tart
Jacob Dukman
Logan Chisholm
Matthew DelRosso
Maxwell Hammond
Nazareth Greer
Ryan Hiltz
Shawn Stelling
   

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business and Economics is home to the Bloomberg Lab at Allegheny College.  When hiring new employees, businesses involved in banking and finance are looking for students skilled in utilizing the Bloomberg terminal to conduct research using the world’s most valuable tool in banking and finance.  Allegheny’s Bloomberg terminals teach students to access and analyze real-time data on every market, discover breaking news, perform in-depth research and take advantage of sophisticated communications tools.

Why Economic Dignity should be the North Star for Economic Policy

Economic Dignity, a book by Gene SperlingOn October 29th, the Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business and Economics and Allegheny Law & Policy program welcomed Gene Sperling, Former Director, National Economic Council and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy under Presidents Clinton and Obama.  He led a lively discussion of how his call for Economic Dignity has been highlighted by the COVID crisis, and how it should inform progressive policy going forward.

His remarks centered around the principles proposed in his book, Economic Dignity.  Sperling’s book outlines a profound big-picture vision of why the promotion of dignity should be the singular end goal by which we chart America’s economic future.

Sperling focuses on three pillars, each “essential and interdependent” when considering the economic impact on the lives of everyday Americans:

  • The ability to care for family without economic deprivation or desperation denying us the most meaningful moments and joys in our most important loving relationships;
  • The capacity to pursue potential and a sense of purpose and meaning; and
  • The ability to contribute and participate in the economy with respect, free from domination or humiliation.[i]

Sperling writes, “Amid all the metrics, means, policies, labels and debates over political strategies that bombard us daily, it is this vision of economic dignity that should be the North Star for economic policy that guides us every step of the way.” (Economic Dignity, pg. 297)

Gene Sperling is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress. He was President Clinton’s National Economic Advisor and Director of the National Economic Council from 1997 to 2001 and Deputy National Economic Advisor from 1993 to 1997. Mr. Sperling recently served as a top economic advisor to the Kerry-Edwards presidential campaign. He is a columnist and commentator for Bloomberg Business News and a contributing editor for the DLC’s Blueprint Magazine, serves as director of the Center for Universal Education at the Council of Foreign Relations, and has been a contributing writer and consultant to the television show The West Wing. He has appeared on Meet the Press, Face the Nation, This Week, Good Morning America, Nightline, and CNN’s Late Edition, and is a frequent contributor to NPR. His articles have appeared in The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Inc. magazine, Financial Times, Foreign Policy, and others.  of Form

Follow Gene on Twitter: https://twitter.com/genebsperling

 

[i] Sperling, Gene (2020) Penguin Press, Economic Dignity, p 30

 

Marketing Monday – Understanding Intuitive Marketing: 8 Mistakes Persuasive Marketing Makes

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics welcomed Dr. Stephen Genco on Monday, November 9 to discuss persuasive marketing and his ongoing research. You can view his lecture here on YouTube

Stephen Genco is a marketing innovator, entrepreneur, management consultant, and educator. In 2006, he founded one of the first research firms devoted to applying neuroscience, social psychology, and behavioral economics to the study of marketing and consumer choice. Today, he is an active educator and speaker, conducting seminars and workshops around the world. Dr. Genco holds doctoral, master’s, and bachelor’s degrees from Stanford University and a master’s degree from the University of British Columbia. A pioneer in the study of unconscious influences on consumer choice and behavior, he has written two books: Neuromarketing for Dummies (co-author, 2013) and Intuitive Marketing (2019).

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics attracts Allegheny’s next generation of business innovators and entrepreneurs by providing a host of co-curricular activities that connect with and deepen their classroom experiences. The Lunchtime Learning Lecture Series provides students with opportunities to gain valuable information on topics and industries related to internships and careers.

Research in Economics: Is Tourism good for Locals? Evidence from Barcelona

Rocio MedereThe Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics welcomed Dr. Rocio Medere, Assistant Professor of Economics, Southern Methodist University on November 4.  Dr. Medere is the economist who asked the research question, “Is tourism good for locals?”

According to Dr. Meder, “We embed a Ricardo-Viner framework into a rich urban geography and show that the welfare impact of shocks depends only on (1) the spatial patterns of consumption and income; and (2) the price and wage effects of the shock throughout the city. We use spatially disaggregated consumption and income data to estimate the price and wage effects of Barcelona’s tourist boom.” You can view her lecture here on YouTube.

The research identifies these effects using an identification strategy based on monthly variation in the aggregate composition of tourists’ origin. On average, local workers suffer slightly from tourism, but these average effects mask substantial heterogeneity across space, ranging from a -19 to a +4 percent welfare change between low and high tourist seasons. The inner city residents bear the largest price changes but enjoy the largest income gains, whereas peripheric neighborhoods suffer lower but sizable price changes with none to moderate income benefits.

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business and Economics organizes faculty seminars to provide Allegheny College and visiting faculty the opportunities to give presentations based on their research agendas. Students, faculty and staff attend to learn more about cutting-edge research.

Two Events Provide an Insider View into the Art & Science of Marketing

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics hosted two marketing presentations as part of the Lunchtime Lecture Series on October 26 and 27, 2020.

Scott Morgan
Scott Morgan

Marketing Monday, October 26:  How do Advertising Agencies Present Themselves to Clients?  Scott Morgan, President/Partner of Brunner, Inc., Pittsburgh gave students an insider’s view into ad agency operation.

Scott is president and partner of Brunner, a top 100 U.S. independent advertising agency with offices in Pittsburgh and Atlanta. He is also chairman of Magnet, the global network of independent ad agencies. The agency is known for its creativity, including its Super Bowl work that was Adweek’s “Brand Story of the Year” and for its expertise in digital media and performance marketing, often cited by Forrester as a marketing innovator.  Watch his presentation here on YouTube

Carla Nagel
Carla Nagel

On Tuesday, October 27, Carla Nagel, the Executive Director of the Neuromarketing Science & Business Association and the founder of the Neuromarketing World Forum presented, “The World of Neuromarketing: How Neuromarketing, Around the Globe, is Used to Improve Organization Goals.”

Carla Nagel is the Executive Director of the Neuromarketing Science & Business Association and the founder of the Neuromarketing World Forum. She is an open-minded community manager and masters ‘getting things done’ in a nice and friendly way. Although she does not have a background in neuromarketing, she developed an objective helicopter view on the industry worldwide. Carla founded the NMSBA in 2012 and since then she runs it with enthusiasm. Together with her team she is responsible for the publications “Insights”, the Neuromarketing Yearbook, the Shopper Brain Conference Series and the Neuromarketing World Forum.

Email bryan@allegheny.edu to register.

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics attracts Allegheny’s next generation of business innovators and entrepreneurs by providing a host of co-curricular activities that connect with and deepen their classroom experiences. The Lunchtime Learning Lecture Series provides students with opportunities to gain valuable information on topics and industries related to internships and careers.

 

How can a student discover a career in the NFL?  Isaac Gittens ’14 can help

 

On October 22, the Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics welcomed Isaac Gittens ’14, Senior Program Coordinator at the National Football League (NFL) who presented “Building a Career in Sport.” Isaac shared his journey from Allegheny College to the NFL, using Twitter and showing up when unexpected. How can a student discover a career in the NFL?  Isaac can help.

According to Isaac, there are 4 must-have skill sets for a successful career in the NFL:

  1. Excellent presentation skills – be prepared to present at a high level.
  2. Organizational skills.
  3. Interpersonal communication skills- the ability to work with all kinds of people.
  4. Time management skills – everything moves very fast in the sports universe.

View Isaac’s presentation here on YouTube

Isaac Gittens joined the National Football League in 2016 in Player Engagement. After serving two years in PE he transitioned to the Y&HS Football department in Football Operations. A New Jersey native, Isaac earned a bachelor’s degree in managerial economics from Allegheny College and master’s in sport management from Baylor University. During his time at Baylor, he served as a graduate assistant at the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA).

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics attracts Allegheny’s next generation of business innovators and entrepreneurs by providing a host of co-curricular activities that connect with and deepen their classroom experiences. The Lunchtime Learning Lecture Series provides students with opportunities to gain valuable information on topics and industries related to internships and careers.

 

Stretching your Degree and Resisting Prescription: Defining your Path and Taking the Road Less Travelled

Denise Jones '13Denise Jones ’13  returned on Wednesday, October 14 to discuss her unique journey from Allegheny to the University of Michigan, where she is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Public Health, Education, and Psychology.

In her conversation, she addressed

  • Her experiences as one of the only black female Economics students in the Department, and how she cultivated mentorship relationships that assisted her in pursuing work that mattered,
  • How to utilize one’s Economics Degree as a means to an end, and not the end itself,
  • The value of an Economics Degree in non-traditional careers,
  • Why students should “resist” prescriptive career routes and think more openly and creatively about connecting one’s academic training with their passions and purposes,
  • The importance of doing the “unglorified” work.

Click here to view Denise’s presentation on YouTube.

Denise Jones is an educator, scholar, student advocate, and non-profit leader with over six years of practical and professional experience. Upon graduating from Allegheny College with a degree in Economics and Black Studies, Denise set out to transform the lives of students as a classroom educator in San Antonio, Texas. There, she facilitated the learning of over 180 6th – 8th graders in the subject areas of English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and AVID.

During her time, Denise taught dedicated scholars who, despite their difficult circumstances, invested in learning and growing academically and personally. While she received great joy from her students’ growth and development, Denise recognized that she and her students’ commitment to learning were not enough to break the cycles of poverty and oppression that impeded their successes. Her frustration with the school system’s approaches to addressing inequities and disparities led Denise to pursue a master’s degree in Education Policy from Columbia University’s Teachers College (TC).

As a TC student, Denise amalgamated her practical classroom experiences with theoretical training and utilized her students’ unique stories and experiences to cogitate sustainable solutions to our educational system’s most critical problems. Denise also taught adult student learners and supported their journeys toward obtaining their general education diplomas. Beyond this, Denise worked with distinguished faculty from Columbia and NYU on research projects involving school choice, teacher evaluation, and studenthealth.

These diverse experiences informed Denise’s graduate studies and further catalyzed her interest in
exploring out-of-school and summer-time learning, peer mentoring, and educational inequity.
Denise returned to Youth Enrichment Services (YES), where she currently serves as the Assistant
Executive Director, once she completed her master’s degree. What started out as a three-month summer
appointment turned into four years of youth engagement, student advocacy, program implementation,
strategic planning, non-profit leadership, and community-based research.

Denise’s time at YES has been extremely fulfilling as she has collaborated with partners and stakeholders to move the grassroots non-profit forward, remained actively involved in research and scholarship that has led to national and international conferences and publications – with the most recent in the Afterschool Matters Journal – developed meaningful youth enrichment opportunities that impacted the health of local communities, increased the programming scope and budget, co-facilitated sessions empowering African scholars and female entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe, committed to the professional growth and development of her colleagues, and supported the collegiate journeys of over 30 youth.

Looking Towards the Future

While her work at YES has been extremely rewarding, Denise is ready to connect her grassroots efforts to
the academy to support youth far beyond YES. With the help of scholars at Michigan, Denise hopes to
continue testing YES’ mentorship model and building the case for how community-based practitioners can
help underserved students in out-of-school learning spaces. Denise is eager to explore how to embolden
students from inner-city, low-income communities to shift their mindsets about themselves and to look
inward in a way that connects them to their life purposes and elicits their sense of civic responsibility to their communities.

Denise is especially interested in investigating the factors that youth identify as important to navigating the craziness of their communities and to persisting through their often disturbance-ridden secondary institutions. Denise is also interested in examining the relationship between mentorship and motivation and how this effects youths’ college access and persistence. Ultimately, Denise’s work is youth-
centric and multi-disciplinary in nature as it combines a host of disciplines and academic thoughts.

Denise foresees her future as a researcher pursuing solutions and strategies to ameliorate the challenges
that persist in urban communities and schools. Upon obtaining her PhD, she fully anticipates leading – and using – research to better serve youth. Her role will be that of changing lives, building wealth, and
empowering the community, as she believes the community is the unit of change – it builds the knowledge
and then informs the academy.

Denise is excited to join a unique cohort of scholars whose alliance is critical in advancing education policy issues.

This presentation is sponsored by the Womxn in Economics Club at Allegheny College.  Please email womxninecon@allegheny.edu for more information.  

Marketing Monday – John Paul Marcantonio ’01

John Paul Marcantonio '01On October 5, the Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business and Economics welcomed John Paul Marcantonio ’01, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Gale Pacific Ltd. John Paul will share his Allegheny journey and how his company has adapted during the ongoing pandemic.  

GALE Pacific Limited (GALE) is a trusted leading global marketer and manufacturer of branded screening and shading products for domestic, commercial and industrial applications.  The company has recently introduced GALE Guard reusable face masks to meet the public’s needs for face masks with antimicrobial treated fabric.

Click here for John Paul’s Presentation on YouTube

John Paul joined GALE Pacific in October 2017 as the General Manager of the Americas business.  He was appointed Chief Executive Officer in November 2019 and was appointed as Managing Director in August 2020. John Paul has extensive experience working across both consumer and commercial products sectors globally.  Prior to joining GALE Pacific, John Paul built an impressive career at Newell Brands in roles of increasing responsibility in marketing, sales and management over fifteen years.

John Paul lived and worked in Melbourne, Australia for several years as the Regional Marketing Director of Newell Brands’ APAC hardware businesses and has held multiple global product and brand marketing leadership positions over his tenure.  In his last role before joining GALE, John Paul served as the Global Vice President of Marketing for the Rubbermaid brand.

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics attracts Allegheny’s next generation of business innovators and entrepreneurs by providing a host of co-curricular activities that connect with and deepen their classroom experiences. The Lunchtime Learning Lecture Series provides students with opportunities to gain valuable information on topics and industries related to internships and careers.

 

Allegheny Fellows Interview Anne Gearan ’85, White House Correspondent for The Washington Post

Anne Gearan ’85, White House correspondent for The Washington Post On Wednesday, October 7, Allegheny College will welcome Anne Gearan ’85, White House correspondent for The Washington Post to answer questions from both the Center for Political Participation and Center for Business & Economics Fellows concerning this year’s presidential election campaign.  The Allegheny community is invited to listen in as Anne fields student questions and illuminates presidential campaign media coverage.

Allegheny Community members can supply their questions in advance of this event due to the tight time constraints, and the Fellows will ask the questions on your behalf.

To register for what promises to be a lively discussion, please email bryan@allegheny.edu.

Anne Gearan is a White House correspondent for The Washington Post, with a focus on foreign policy and national security. She covered the Hillary Clinton campaign and the State Department for The Post before joining the White House beat. She joined the paper in 2012 from the Associated Press, where she served as chief diplomatic correspondent, Pentagon correspondent, White House reporter and national security editor. She also covered the Supreme Court. Anne is a 1985 Allegheny College graduate with a BA in English and History.

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics is partnering with the Allegheny Law & Policy Program to sponsor this special event.

Research in Economics: Law Enforcement Leaders and The Racial Composition of Arrests

George Bulman, Ph.D.In the second lecture in this year’s theme, Seeking Justice in a Divided Nation, the Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics welcomed Dr. George Bulman, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of California, who presented his research entitled “Law Enforcement Leaders and The Racial Composition of Arrests.”

Dr. Bulman introduces a novel avenue of study for understanding the mechanisms behind racial discrimination in law enforcement. He will explain a new 25‐year panel history of the race of every U.S. sheriff to shed light on the potentially important role of managers who make hiring decisions and set departmental priorities. Comparing agencies that experience racial transitions to agencies with overlapping jurisdictions reveals that the ratio of Black‐to‐White arrests is significantly higher under White sheriffs. Heterogeneity analysis indicates that the effects are driven by arrests for less‐serious offenses and by targeting Black crime types.

Dr. Bulman’s paper can be found at this link | You can watch his presentation here on YouTube

George Bulman is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Prof. Bulman is a public economist who specializes in evaluating the effects of local and federal policies using large administrative data sets. His research examines topics such as the factors that shape the college enrollment decisions of low-income students and the role of race in law enforcement. His papers have been published in leading economics journals, including the Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Labor Economics, and the American Economic Journal. Prior to joining the faculty at U.C. Santa Cruz, he earned a B.S. at Haverford College and Ph.D. at Stanford University.

The Bruce R. Thompson Center for Business & Economics attracts Allegheny’s next generation of business innovators and entrepreneurs by providing a host of co-curricular activities that connect with and deepen their classroom experiences. The Lunchtime Learning Lecture Series provides students with opportunities to gain valuable information on topics and industries related to internships and careers.