News & Updates

Allegheny College Students to Attend National Conference at Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics

Allegheny College students will participate in the National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement conference at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), February 3-5.

The 2017 National Campaign conference will focus on identifying the root causes of national divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election and work to formulate strategies to bridge gaps between all Americans. Student ambassadors and staff members from 28 colleges and universities across the country will convene on the Harvard campus with the mission to create a nationally coordinated program to Reconnect America.

Allegheny students Jesse Tomkiewicz and Hannah Firestone will attend the conference along with Dr. Patrick Jackson, visiting assistant professor of History and Philosophy and Religious Studies.

“The conference presents a unique opportunity for tomorrow’s leaders to have a vitally important discussion about divisiveness in our country and how we as a nation can best move forward with civility and respect for all,” said Allegheny College President James H. Mullen, Jr.

Brian Harward, director of Allegheny’s Center for Political Participation, said students come away from the conference inspired.

“Allegheny has sent students from its Center for Political Participation for several years. Each time, students return to our campus and community energized to engage the important and complex issues that confront us,” Harward said.

Since 2003, the National Campaign has held annual conferences to identify collaborative projects, foster engagement in electoral politics, assist students in pursuing careers in public service, and provide a foundation in civic education. Led by a team of Harvard undergraduate students, the collegiate ambassadors to the National Campaign work together to achieve concrete goals, such as working with local election offices to improve the voting experience for their campus communities.

Other participating colleges and universities include Arizona State University, Elon University, Franklin & Marshall College, Georgetown University, Harvard University, Louisiana State University, The Ohio State University, Rutgers University, Saint Anselm College, Simpson College, Tennessee State University, University of Florida, University of Louisville, University of Rochester, University of Southern California, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, University of Utah, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, University of Oklahoma, Howard University, United States Military Academy, Tufts University, University of Chicago, Colby College, and University of Texas at Austin.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny College Students to Attend National Conference at Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics

Allegheny College students will participate in the National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement conference at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics (IOP), February 3-5.

The 2017 National Campaign conference will focus on identifying the root causes of national divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election and work to formulate strategies to bridge gaps between all Americans. Student ambassadors and staff members from 28 colleges and universities across the country will convene on the Harvard campus with the mission to create a nationally coordinated program to Reconnect America.

Allegheny students Jesse Tomkiewicz and Hannah Firestone will attend the conference along with Dr. Patrick Jackson, visiting assistant professor of History and Philosophy and Religious Studies.

“The conference presents a unique opportunity for tomorrow’s leaders to have a vitally important discussion about divisiveness in our country and how we as a nation can best move forward with civility and respect for all,” said Allegheny College President James H. Mullen, Jr.

Brian Harward, director of Allegheny’s Center for Political Participation, said students come away from the conference inspired.

“Allegheny has sent students from its Center for Political Participation for several years. Each time, students return to our campus and community energized to engage the important and complex issues that confront us,” Harward said.

Since 2003, the National Campaign has held annual conferences to identify collaborative projects, foster engagement in electoral politics, assist students in pursuing careers in public service, and provide a foundation in civic education. Led by a team of Harvard undergraduate students, the collegiate ambassadors to the National Campaign work together to achieve concrete goals, such as working with local election offices to improve the voting experience for their campus communities.

Other participating colleges and universities include Arizona State University, Elon University, Franklin & Marshall College, Georgetown University, Harvard University, Louisiana State University, The Ohio State University, Rutgers University, Saint Anselm College, Simpson College, Tennessee State University, University of Florida, University of Louisville, University of Rochester, University of Southern California, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, University of Utah, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, University of Oklahoma, Howard University, United States Military Academy, Tufts University, University of Chicago, Colby College, and University of Texas at Austin.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Angela Keysor (Weiss Faculty Lecture)

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Angela Keysor to Deliver Weiss Faculty Lecture

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Angela Keysor to Deliver Weiss Faculty Lecture

Angela Keysor, assistant professor of history at Allegheny College, will speak on “Racial Borders of Belonging: Community Networks of Care, African Americans and Citizenship in Massachusetts, 1780–1810,” as part of the Karl W. Weiss ’87 Faculty Lecture Series for 2016–17. The free, public talk is scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m. in Room 301/302 of the Henderson Campus Center.

In her lecture, Keysor will discuss the experiences of African American residents of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to argue that after the Revolutionary War, local health care networks within Massachusetts transitioned into racialized welfare processes. Keysor will explore how, as a result of two court cases that created legal confusion, Massachusetts selectmen used arguments over money to construct substantial differences in the welfare a town gave to their white and black residents.

The Weiss Lecture Series showcases research conducted by Allegheny professors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Pinnow to be published, awarded fellowship

Professor of History Ken Pinnow’s article “From All Sides: Interdisciplinary Knowledge, Scientific Collaboration, and the Soviet Criminological Laboratories of the 1920s” has been accepted for publication in Slavic Review. Pinnow also was awarded a Short-term Jordan Center Fellowship at New York University. He will spend a month next summer in New York City researching the history of medical ethics and experimentation in the Soviet Union.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Pinnow to be published, awarded fellowship

Professor of History Ken Pinnow’s article “From All Sides: Interdisciplinary Knowledge, Scientific Collaboration, and the Soviet Criminological Laboratories of the 1920s” has been accepted for publication in Slavic Review. Pinnow also was awarded a Short-term Jordan Center Fellowship at New York University. He will spend a month next summer in New York City researching the history of medical ethics and experimentation in the Soviet Union.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research