News & Updates

Student Journalist Angela Mauroni Is Finalist in Mark of Excellence Awards

April 20, 2016 – Angela Mauroni, news editor for The Campus, the student newspaper at Allegheny College, was a finalist in the Society of Professional Journalists Region 1 Mark of Excellence awards. The MOE Awards honor the best of collegiate journalism from a calendar year.

The awards were presented at the Region I spring conference in New Haven, Connecticut on April 10. Region 1, the largest of the 12 SPJ regions, includes Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont.

Mauroni, a junior from New Kensington, is majoring in English with minors in history, political science and journalism in the public interest. She will serve as co-editor-in-chief of The Campus in 2016-17.

Alex Weidenhof, junior news editor for The Campus, traveled to New Haven to accept the award on behalf of Mauroni and The Campus, which is in its 140th year of publishing at Allegheny College.

Photo: Angela Mauroni, center, with friends

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Student Journalist Angela Mauroni Is Finalist in Mark of Excellence Awards

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April 20, 2016 – Angela Mauroni, news editor for The Campus, the student newspaper at Allegheny College, was a finalist in the Society of Professional Journalists Region 1 Mark of Excellence awards. The MOE Awards honor the best of collegiate journalism from a calendar year.

The awards were presented at the Region I spring conference in New Haven, Connecticut on April 10. Region 1, the largest of the 12 SPJ regions, includes Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont.

Mauroni, a junior from New Kensington, is majoring in English with minors in history, political science and journalism in the public interest. She will serve as co-editor-in-chief of The Campus in 2016-17.

Alex Weidenhof, junior news editor for The Campus, traveled to New Haven to accept the award on behalf of Mauroni and The Campus, which is in its 140th year of publishing at Allegheny College.

Photo: Angela Mauroni, center, with friends

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Student Journalists at Allegheny College To Host Open House for Birthday of Ida Tarbell, Class of 1880

Oct. 29, 2015 – The student journalists of The Campus, the award-winning student newspaper at Allegheny College, will celebrate pioneering journalist Ida Tarbell’s birthday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, November 5 in the newspaper’s newsroom, Campus Center 314. The public is invited for cake and an open house.

Tarbell was born in Erie County on November 5, 1857 and grew up in Titusville. The only woman to matriculate at Allegheny College in 1876 and graduate in 1880, Tarbell set a standard for investigative reporting that journalists today continue to hold high.

“I think Ida Tarbell’s legacy is something that resonates deeply with the work we do for The Campus,” said Christina Bryson, the college newspaper’s editor-in-chief. “She never let anything or anyone stop her from doing her journalistic duty. Ida teaches us that it’s our duty as journalists to report the truth no matter how tough it may be to actually report. And I think as long as we continue working towards that goal of fairness and accuracy while also informing the public of the tougher issues, then we as student journalists are honoring Ida Tarbell’s legacy.”

Tarbell is best known for her 1904 book “The History of the Standard Oil Company,” in which she revealed the unethical means used by John D. Rockefeller to monopolize the early oil industry. Eight years later, as a result of Tarbell’s investigative work, the Supreme Court issued a decision to break up the Standard Oil trust.

In 1999 the New York University journalism department ranked “The History of the Standard Oil Company” fifth in a listing of the top 100 journalistic works of the 20th century.

Tarbell was a trustee of Allegheny College for many years. The Ida M. Tarbell Collection at Allegheny College contains her professional papers and book collection. Her papers, which represent more than 17,000 items, are digitized and accessible from the college library’s website.

The Campus newspaper has served the Allegheny College community since 1876. Tarbell was one of its earliest editors.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Professor Hatch Presents Her Work from Liberia

Visiting Professor of Journalism in the Public Interest Cheryl Hatch did a presentation of her work from Liberia this summer. She gave a talk, titled “Let this Ebola end,” and presented her photographs at the Mattapoisett Free Public Library on July 21 in Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. In addition, her image “Watch Night” was among the 25 selected for the Women in Photojournalism Conference and was shown in Denver at the gallery reception for the exhibit on August 15.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

The Campus Newspaper Wins First-place Mark of Excellence Award

The Campus has won a first-place Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists in Region 1, which includes Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. Sam Stephenson ’15, co-editor-in-chief of The Campus, and photo editor Meghan Hayman ’16 won the award in the category of breaking news. Mark of Excellence Awards honor the best of collegiate journalism from a calendar year. First-place winners move on to the national competition among category winners from the 12 regions of the Society of Professional Journalists. Visiting Professor of Journalism in the Public Interest Cheryl Hatch serves as faculty advisor to The Campus.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Hatch Presents Her Recent Work from Liberia at Three Colleges and Universities in North Carolina

Cheryl Hatch, visiting professor in journalism in the public interest and documentary photographer, presented her recent work from Liberia at Wake Forest University, High Point University, and Guilford College March 23-26. Fellow journalist Brian Castner joined Hatch as part of a weeklong visit to Campus Consortium partners in North Carolina’s Triad region at the invitation of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Rather than simply considering the number of deaths, the journalists examined the efforts by local communities and the U.S. military to try to contain the spread of Ebola in Liberia. They also reported on the celebrations of Watch Night and the expected reopening of schools, which had been closed for more than six months. The journalists received a grant from the Pulitzer Center to help fund part of their travel in December 2015 and January 2015. During their week in North Carolina, Hatch and Castner spoke to journalism students, senior ROTC cadets, student journalists on campus newspapers, and faculty members. They also gave two public talks to community members.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Allegheny, Saegertown journalists win awards

You can feel the excitement in the air when walking into the newsrooms of The Campus and The Panther Press, as the student newspapers have won nine Pennsylvania News Association awards between them.

The Campus, Allegheny College’s student newspaper with a circulation of 2,100, garnered five PNA Student Keystone Press Awards including two first place honors and three honorable mentions.

“I want to give all the props to the students,” said Campus adviser Cheryl Hatch.

Read the full story.

Earl Corp is a reporter for The Meadville Tribune.

Photo: Christina Bryson, news editor at The Campus newspaper at Allegheny College, and Amanda Spadaro, co-editor in chief, layout pages for the newspaper on Thursday night. Photo by The Meadville Tribune.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

The Campus Newspaper Wins Five Keystone Press Awards

The Campus won two first-place awards and three honorable mentions in the four-year college category from the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association. Sam Stephenson ’15, co-editor-in-chief of The Campus, and photo editor Meghan Hayman ’16 won a first-place Student Keystone Press Award in the category of general news. The staff of The Campus also won a first-place award for layout and design on “The Story Next Door,” a special edition of The Campus that published student work from a conference that explored community journalism in action. Honorable mentions were awarded to Amasa Smith ’17, in the category of feature photos; Meghan Hayman, in the category of news photos; and Elliott Bartels ’15, Sam Stephenson and Amanda Spadaro ’15, for The Campus’s website. Cheryl Hatch, visiting assistant professor of journalism in the public interest, serves as faculty adviser to The Campus.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Living Journalism in ‘Real Life in Real Time’

Allegheny Professor and Photojournalist Takes her Skills to Liberia

Cheryl Hatch, Allegheny visiting assistant professor of journalism in the public interest, won’t be in class for the first week of the spring semester.

CORRECTION: She won’t physically be in class – but she plans to be there via Skype.

That’s because Hatch has taken her photojournalism skills to cover stories in Liberia, thanks, in part, to funding she and writer Brian Castner received from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

According to its website, the Pulitzer Center “is an innovative award-winning nonprofit journalism organization dedicated to supporting the independent international journalism that U.S. media organizations are increasingly less able to undertake.” 

While in Liberia, Hatch and Castner, who arrived on Dec. 29, 2014, are covering the U.S. military efforts to assist the Liberian government in combating the Ebola outbreak. Their first story, “‘Let This Ebola End’: Liberians Prepare for 2015 with Parties and Prayer,” served as Jan. 5’s headline for the international news organization VICE News.

“I believe a journalism professor needs to continue practicing journalism, and this is a timely story in Africa, where I’ve done much of my work in the past two decades,” said Hatch, explaining why she decided to spend her winter break more than 3,500 miles from Meadville. “I teach by example. I want the students to see me do the work I love outside the classroom and bring it back to the classroom. Journalism is real life in real time.

“Receiving support from the Pulitzer Center is a terrific honor and a big help, since this is an expensive story to cover,” she adds.

Hatch plans to Skype with her JOURN100 news writing and JOURN300 multimedia classes on Jan. 13.

UPDATE (1/13/15): Since this article was published on Jan. 12, Hatch successfully Skyped from Liberia with her news writing and multimedia classes on Jan. 13. Hatch conducted the course as though she were physically in the room, beginning by having the students come closer to the camera to introduce themselves so she could put a face with a name. “Even though I’m not physically there, I felt it was important as your professor to be there on your first day of classes,” she said.

Student Christina Smith from the news writing class said this was her first course with Hatch. Afterward, she said, “I’m really excited to hear about her experiences. She seems so knowledgeable; what a great person to learn from.”

Photo by Bill Owen '74.

Cheryl Hatch interacts with her class via Skype on Jan. 13. Photo by Bill Owen ’74.

During last semester’s news writing class, Hatch says the students interviewed NPR photojournalist and video editor David Gilkey via Skype as part of their final exam. Gilkey recently had returned from covering the Ebola outbreak in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Hatch met Castner, author of The Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life That Follows, when he spoke at Allegheny during the Combat Paper Project in September.

Hatch plans to return to the United States on Jan. 16. To follow her journey in Liberia, visit http://pulitzercenter.org/project/africa-liberia-ebola-war-veterans-US.

Read the Erie Times-News article about Hatch’s journey.

Source: Academics, Publications & Research

Faculty and alumni exhibit unusual combinations

By Rachel Wang, Staff Writer
November 6, 2014
The Campus

The art galleries of Allegheny College held the reception of Annual Faculty and Alumni Art Exhibit on Tuesday, Nov. 4. The exhibit featured egg tempera, oil and watercolor paintings by alumnus Jeff Gola, ’82, and also included art works of Sue Buck, Heather Brand, Amara Geffen, Darren Lee Miller, Steve Prince, Byron Rich, Richard Schindler and Ian Thomas from department of art, as well as Cheryl Hatch, visiting assistant professor of journalism in the public interest and Mike Keeley, professor of communication arts.

“It’s always a challenge to figure out how pieces relate to each other, but we worked together as a group to find a good visual presentation so that one body of work by one person would flow in a logical way to another body of work,” said Darren Lee Miller, assistant professor of art and gallery director of Allegheny College. Each artist has different styles and ideas at work in different media. Considering this, Miller tried to make sense of organizing the gallery and locating drawings, paintings, printmaking, photographs and sculptures harmoniously in the gallery.

Read the full story.

Photo by RACHEL WANG

Source: Academics, Publications & Research