FS 102 Descriptions (Spring, 2019)

Specific descriptions of sections of FS 102, Academic Discourse II, offered in Spring 2019:

Please consult WebAdvisor to confirm the days, times, and locations of these sections.

FS*102 § 1
Professor Hollerman
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Notions of Infinity
Coming to grips with the infinite. The infinite surfaces in philosophy, mathematics, cosmology, religion, and art, but often in different ways. Readings by authors such as Democritus, Aristotle, Aquinas, Galileo, Cantor, and Escher, ranging from the ancient Greeks to modern times, are taken up. Student papers and oral presentations argue the validity or usefulness of a particular notion of infinity as described by one or more authors. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 2
Professor Starczewski
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
(re)Presentations of the European Enlightenment
An exploration of the Enlightenment of the late 17th and 18th centuries and its representation today. Historians and philosophers have long debated the impacts of the Enlightenment on the Western world (and beyond). By reading primary and secondary sources, students will study various claims related to free thought, democracy, religious tolerance, political self-determination, and equality as well as assess to what degree these values were shaped by proponents and enemies of the Enlightenment. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 3
Professor Wu
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Diplomacy, War, and Chinese Peoples’ Liberation Army
An historical examination of modern Chinese warfare from the 1930s to the 1980s. Using the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945), the Chinese Civil War (1947-1949), and China’s involvement in the Korean and Vietnam Wars as case studies, the course considers modern Chinese warfare and the evolution of Chinese military strategy. Important relationships considered include that between the army and the political parties/state, between the army and the people, between ideological training and weapons, between offense and defense, and between war and diplomacy. The seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 4
Professor Hepler
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
Music and the Mind: Making Sense of Classical Music
An examination of the relationships among music, philosophy, and psychology, focusing on the philosophies in Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century Music. Today we apply “Apollonian” to music that appeals to the intellect and “Dionysian” to music that arouses strong emotions. We follow the musical pendulum as it swings between the two philosophical tendencies and study the landmark composers of the last 400 years, exploring their philosophies and placements within the pendulum’s swing. Students read and discuss modern research into the psychology of musical learning and response and develop their own philosophies about music’s role in society and education. This seminar develops oral and written communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 6
Professor Lewis
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
Walking
An exploration of the functions and meanings of the deceptively simple act of walking. Beginning with a child’s momentous first steps, walking can mean many different things, among them walking for spiritual, political, and economic reasons, for sport and adventure, and for better health. Through texts and direct experiences, we consider why people do or do not walk in different situations, along with the impact of that choice. We will also consider that choice being taken away, by disability or other factors. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 7
Professor Smith
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Terrorism in Spain: An historical perspective
An examination of the various definitions of terrorism and how terrorism has affected the Spanish for hundreds of years. Terrorism in Spain has been church-sponsored, state-sponsored, arisen out of nationalistic groups, and now from international terrorists. In addition to examining the history of terrorism in Spain, we will explore the presence of the theme of terror in Spanish art, literature, legend, music, and film. This seminar develops written and oral communication with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 8
Professor Golden
TTH – 3:00 PM 4:15 PM
Contemporary Topics in the US Economy
An exploration of contemporary topics within the US economy. This seminar investigates some of the major economic policy debates of today. Topics such as raising the minimum wage, limiting migration to the U.S., whether to repeal and replace Obamacare, and the viability of Social Security are examined. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 9
Professor Willey
MWF – 2:30 PM 3:20 PM
The Harmony of the World
“A study of the historical belief that the universe is guided by principles of harmony. For over two-thousand years it was thought that everything from the motion of the heavens, to the balance of the seasons, to the composition of the human soul could be described in terms of musical harmony. We trace the history of the idea from the ancient Greeks to present day string theory, examining its many manifestations in philosophy, music, science, and literature. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 10
Professor Wesoky
MWF – 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
Paying Attention
A study of the many ways that our attention has become a valuable commodity. Topics to be discussed include the political economy of distraction and procrastination, the effects of social media and the internet on our political and social lives, the relationship between technology and mental health issues, and various modes of challenging and resisting these trends. Students will also have an opportunity to investigate approaches to develop skills for mindfully paying attention. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 11
Professor Henceroth
MWF – 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
Political Speech and Elections
A study of US political speech and elections. Particularly in the age of social media, legislative speeches are able to be disseminated throughout the country and even globally. Students investigate campaign commercials, posters, and other forms of political speech that are routinely produced with the intention of influencing voters’ minds and opinions in the lead up to an election. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 12
Professor Choate
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
Waste Not, Want Not
A study of of sewage, and waste products associated with clothing and plastic consumption. We investigate the linear production that results in an excess of unwanted material, and the negative environmental implications of waste. We explore more sustainable, alternative forms of production and disposal; and discuss methods of waste reduction from altering consumption to finding unique ways to use it. For example, is humanure the solution to preventing energy intensive fertilizer production? This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 14
Professor Wilson
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Celebrity
A critical examination of celebrity culture. From sports to social media, celebrity is a predominant force in contemporary society. In this seminar, students wrestle with key questions raised by celebrity culture. Why are celebrities so prevalent in popular media culture? Why and how do celebrities matter to audiences and fans? How do celebrities shape our ideas and practices of self? What do celebrities tell us about our society, including gender, sexuality, race, class, and citizenship? This seminar develops oral and written communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 15
Professor Tompkins
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Celebrity
A critical examination of celebrity culture. From sports to social media, celebrity is a predominant force in contemporary society. In this seminar, students wrestle with key questions raised by celebrity culture. Why are celebrities so prevalent in popular media culture? Why and how do celebrities matter to audiences and fans? How do celebrities shape our ideas and practices of self? What do celebrities tell us about our society, including gender, sexuality, race, class, and citizenship? This seminar develops oral and written communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 16
Professor Patterson
MWF – 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
Holocaust Theatre
A study of the representation of the Holocaust onstage. Given its singularity as a historic event, the Holocaust poses particular issues when used as the subject for art, for artists, and audiences. This course investigates the genre of Holocaust theatre and takes a critical approach to the specific questions it presents. Students examine how specific plays are representative of the genre, and study a range of critical theories. Coursework emphasizes the use of critical and philosophical texts relevant to representing the Holocaust onstage. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 17
Professor Mumme
MWF – 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
The Evolutionary Biology of Sex
An exploration of sex and sexual behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Research over the last quarter century has revealed an astonishing diversity of sexual practices among animals and other sexually reproducing organisms. Students explore this diversity and ask what, if anything, can be learned about human sexual behavior by examining sex in its broad evolutionary context. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 18
Professor Mitchell
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
Monks and their Money: Buddhism, Business, Ethics
An investigation of Buddhist views on and uses of money. Money and religion are commonly thought of as uneasy bedfellows—religious traditions handle spiritual or otherworldly concerns, while money is tied to the physical or this-worldly concerns. We discuss the various ways that people have explained, critiqued, or exalted the interplay of Buddhism and money, from those who saw Buddhist use of money as a sign of religious degeneracy to those who suggest that Buddhism can be an inspiration for better business practices. We examine primary religious texts, scholarly case studies, theoretical works, popular culture references, and contemporary how-to guides. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 19
Professor Jackson
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
The Existentialists
“An exploration of how one might best become a fully-functioning human in a universe devoid of inherent meaning. Jean Paul Sartre famously claimed – contrary to almost 2,000 years of heavy-duty thinking on the subject – that our existence precedes our essence. In other words, we show up in the world with no real idea of what to do and no obvious place to go looking for guidance. If our lives are to have meaning, at least according to the Existentialists, then it’s up to us to create it. By getting to know their writings and wrestling some of the same questions they tangled with, we’ll come to see whether or not we agree and what we ought to do as a result. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 21
Professor Geffen
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Activism for Social & Environmental Change: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene
An exploration of art and activism with special focus on the Anthropocene – the period since the start of the Industrial Revolution when our ways of living on the Earth are said to have altered geologic and other life systems. Reading, writing, speaking, and visual exploration of the ways in which Art helps us shift/shape/imagine new patterns of lived experience provide the focus for our work. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context. As part of our investigation of persuasive communication this seminar also includes opportunities for art-making (no prior experience required). This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 22
Professor Simon
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Adulting
An exploration of the noun “adulting”. On social media, millennials use this buzzword to signify their successful completion of mundane tasks. Associated with this word, is the fear of growing up or feeling like you are not an adult, although you are making important life-changing decisions. In this course, we explore strategies to alleviate common fears associated with adulthood. Although we cannot predict the future, students will learn basic skills that will help them to be successful at life. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 23
Professor Garcia
MWF – 9:00 AM 9:50 AM
Science and the General Public
An exploration of general science communication. From Science Fridays to Science News Magazine to Radiolab, a variety of forms of communication exist to engage the general public in the world of science and to increase accessibility of science. However, poor quality science, misinformation, and sensationalized coverage are enormous hurdles for proponents of general scientific literacy. Students critically evaluate the representation of science by news outlets or social media. Participants will develop projects for online publication. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 24
Professor Franz
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Power and Freedom: Negotiating the World Today
An examination of the meaning of democracy as a resource for encountering the world today. Who has power? How does freedom balance with equality in a society based on competition? Why should we care about these ideals? We examine Millennial and iGen identities through contemporary readings and films and explore the tensions between democratic ideals, history, and the practices and the imperatives of unregulated capitalism. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 25
Professor D. Miller
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Power and Freedom: Negotiating the World Today
An examination of the meaning of democracy as a resource for encountering the world today. Who has power? How does freedom balance with equality in a society based on competition? Why should we care about these ideals? We examine Millennial and iGen identities through contemporary readings and films and explore the tensions between democratic ideals, history, and the practices and the imperatives of unregulated capitalism. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 26
Professor J. Miller
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Ethics and Animal Life
An exploration of what it means to treat other creatures fairly. We focus on cases where the interests or needs of human beings conflict with the interests of animals. After examining several theoretical approaches to animal ethics, we consider how they might apply to current controversies ranging from the everyday practice of neutering pets to the rarefied sport of big-game hunting. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.

Cancellation:

 FS*102 § 27 has been cancelled for Spring 2019
FS*102 § 28
Professor Wilkins Bakken
TTH – 9:30 AM 10:45 AM
Creativity and the Liberal Arts: Body, Mind, and Practice
An investigation into the concept of creativity. Creativity is a key element in innovation, originality, and production—in the sciences as much as in the arts—but what exactly is it, and how does it work? Topics include artistic process, the psychology of creative flow, scientific discovery, the economics of a “creative class,” creative writing, and the practical application of creativity in the liberal arts. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 29
Professor Wilkins Bakken
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Creativity and the Liberal Arts: Body, Mind, and Practice
An investigation into the concept of creativity. Creativity is a key element in innovation, originality, and production—in the sciences as much as in the arts—but what exactly is it, and how does it work? Topics include artistic process, the psychology of creative flow, scientific discovery, the economics of a “creative class,” creative writing, and the practical application of creativity in the liberal arts. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 30
Professor Orttung
TTH – 11:00 AM 12:15 PM
Persuasion and Manipulation in Roman Oratory
A study of the strategies by which Roman orators persuaded their audiences. Students study the origins, methods and aims of Roman oratory using primary sources from the early comedies of Plautus and Terence to Cicero’s political speeches and the histories of Sallust and Caesar. Topics include formal argumentation, ethical concepts, theatricality, political buzzwords, and the art of the insult. The semester concludes with a role-playing exercise in which students, using all the tools at their command, debate the fate of Julius Caesar in the year 44 BC. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.
FS*102 § 31
Professor Levine
TTH – 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
Working
An exploration of work. It is the spine of our lives, anchoring where we live and how we live while offering us an income, an identity, a structure, and a source of satisfaction. We examine the way education, gender, background, training affect the work we do and the salary we receive for our efforts. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.

New:

FS*102 § 32
STAFF
MWF – 3:30 PM 4:20 PM
The Politics of Anger
An exploration of the uses and misuses of anger as a political strategy in the contemporary United States. The current climate in the U.S. has sparked many conversations about the legitimacy of public displays of anger and rage across the political spectrum. We investigate both the benefits and limitations of such displays, considering the different forms they take, their ethical and cultural consequences, and their potential for social change. We examine similarities and differences among public expressions of rage along the lines of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexuality. This seminar develops written and oral communication skills with an emphasis on persuasive communication in an academic context.